YOUR QUES­TIONS AN­SWERED

I’VE RE­CENTLY HAD A SERIES OF TEM­PO­RARY JOBS. HOW DO I SOURCE A CRED­I­BLE REF­EREE?

The Courier-Mail - Career One - - News & Advice - email ques­tions to ca­reer­s_qs@news.com.au

EX­PE­RI­ENCED DAR­REN BUCHANAN MAN­AG­ING DIREC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

You can ask the re­port­ing man­ager at one of the com­pa­nies where you com­pleted a tem­po­rary as­sign­ment, or you can ask your re­cruit­ment con­sul­tant. The im­por­tant thing to re­mem­ber about the lat­ter is that our ref­er­ence is re­stricted to the feedback we re­ceive from our clients.

While on as­sign­ment, we per­form var­i­ous checks of your per­for­mance with our client, re­ceiv­ing de­tailed feedback each time. If you have per­formed sev­eral short as­sign­ments for the one con­sul­tant, we can use this feedback to pro­vide an over­all il­lus­tra­tion of your work per­for­mance.

MID-CA­REER AN­DREA DAVEY CHIEF OP­ER­AT­ING OF­FI­CER, EM­PLOY­MENT OF­FICE

Your em­ploy­ers from the tem­po­rary jobs may be will­ing to pro­vide a ref­er­ence, par­tic­u­larly if they have run for a month or longer. I’ve hap­pily pro­vided ref­er­ences for peo­ple who have worked for me over one to three­month pe­ri­ods. If your tem­po­rary roles have run for weeks rather than months you might con­sider seek­ing out a longer as­sign­ment in or­der to give your­self time to build up cred­i­bil­ity with an em­ployer. De­pend­ing on your cir­cum­stances, you could con­sider ap­proach­ing an or­gan­i­sa­tion in the in­dus­try you wish to work in and of­fer to take on an un­paid in­tern­ship.

UP & COM­ING BRIAN CUN­NING­HAM PRAC­TICE LEADER OF AC­COUNT­ING, DAVID­SON

Work­ing as a tem­po­rary staff mem­ber re­quires an enor­mous amount of skill, ma­tu­rity and self-aware­ness. Your series of tem­po­rary jobs tells me you are highly em­ploy­able. Be­fore you do any­thing, you need to be able to ar­tic­u­late the value you added as a temp and how you over­came the chal­lenges of such work. Your man­agers will ap­pre­ci­ate how hard be­ing a temp can be. As your tem­po­rary as­sign­ment draws to a close, speak openly with your man­ager – if your work has been of a high stan­dard they will no doubt be de­lighted to speak on your be­half as a pro­fes­sional ref­eree.

THE EX­PERT DR NERIDA HILLBERG DIREC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FER­RIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

Em­ploy­ers are in­ter­ested in ref­er­ees who can dis­cuss your re­cent workre­lated be­hav­iours and skills. It shouldn’t mat­ter if your ref­er­ees are from per­ma­nent, ca­sual or temp jobs, as long as they are re­cent. It never hurts to ask the peo­ple you re­ported to in the var­i­ous temp roles if they will speak on your be­half. Al­though they may have been short-term jobs, use­ful in­sights can still be pro­vided. It’s help­ful to pro­vide two ref­er­ees. Three is bet­ter in case your two ref­er­ees give dif­fer­ing opin­ions/ac­counts of your ex­pe­ri­ence/skills/at­ti­tude/po­ten­tial.

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