IS IT ENOUGH TO MAN­AGE?

MY EM­PLOYER SUP­PORTS MY MAN­AGE­MENT AS­PI­RA­TIONS BUT ONLY OF­FERED TWO DAYS OF TRAIN­ING THIS YEAR. IS IT ENOUGH?

The Courier-Mail - Career One - - Front Page - email ques­tions to ca­reer­s_qs@news.com.au

EX­PE­RI­ENCED DAR­REN BUCHANAN MAN­AG­ING DI­REC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

Train­ing does not only in­volve for­mal cour­ses. On-the-job learn­ing is of­ten more ef­fec­tive since you are prac­tis­ing the skills in your day-to-date job. You could look for stretch op­por­tu­ni­ties or vol­un­teer to be in­volved in cer­tain projects. Per­haps you could ac­com­pany your boss to a more se­nior-level busi­ness dis­cus­sion or put your­self for­ward to man­age a more se­nior-level project? Look for op­por­tu­ni­ties to work on build­ing re­la­tion­ships and ef­fec­tively mo­ti­vat­ing a group of peo­ple to achieve a busi­ness goal or project. Fi­nally, men­tor­ing can also help you reach your man­age­ment ca­reer goals.

MID-CA­REER AN­DREA DAVEY CHIEF OP­ER­AT­ING OF­FI­CER, EM­PLOY­MENT OF­FICE

On­go­ing learn­ing and pro­fes­sional de­velop­ment are im­por­tant to any role. Whether two days of train­ing is enough will be dif­fer­ent for ev­ery­one and ev­ery role. Train­ing days pro­vide short-term in­ten­sive learn­ing, but don’t for­get about the learn­ing you can take away from your day-to-day role and those around you. I’d rec­om­mend that you dis­cuss with your em­ployer what in­ter­nal op­por­tu­ni­ties there are for you to learn within the work­place – this may be through men­tor­ing, set­ting man­age­ment-spe­cific KPIs and sched­ul­ing monthly or quar­terly re­view ses­sions on your progress.

UP & COM­ING JULIE FORD SE­NIOR EX­EC­U­TIVE CON­SUL­TANT, McARTHUR

Man­age­ment train­ing can take many forms – from for­mal, struc­tured train­ing where you gain a qual­i­fi­ca­tion, or more in­for­mal, on-the-job train­ing where the train­ing is de­liv­ered in a con­sis­tent man­ner and may in­volve one or more se­nior em­ploy­ees of the com­pany. You need to ask for much more than what is be­ing of­fered or take your pro­fes­sional de­velop­ment into your own hands by un­der­tak­ing for­mal ex­ter­nal train­ing, but the best man­age­ment train­ing comes from be­ing men­tored and coached by peo­ple you re­spect ei­ther with your em­ployer or in an­other or­gan­i­sa­tion.

THE EX­PERT DR NERIDA HILLBERG DI­REC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FERRIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

Two days of man­age­ment train­ing isn’t enough to de­velop man­age­rial or lead­er­ship skills. Look for fur­ther growth op­por­tu­ni­ties within your cur­rent job. Are there ad­di­tional re­spon­si­bil­i­ties you can take on to hone the skills you need to progress into a man­age­rial po­si­tion? Be­yond this, you could also con­sider self-fund­ing fur­ther train­ing through an MBA, for in­stance. If a for­mal course is cost-pro­hib­i­tive for you, per­haps seek out a men­tor/coach who is happy to meet reg­u­larly for cof­fee to pro­vide in­for­mal guid­ance on your man­age­rial as­pi­ra­tions.

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