WORK­ING WITH YOUR TRAITS

SEEK re­veals how work­ers can get ahead, no mat­ter their per­son­al­ity type

The Courier-Mail - Career One - - Front Page -

W HEN most peo­ple think of in­flu­ence and suc­cess in the work­place, the im­age of an ex­tro­vert comes to mind – some­one com­fort­ably schmooz­ing at net­work­ing events and loudly cel­e­brat­ing their wins.

It is not the only ver­sion of suc­cess, how­ever, as both in­tro­verts and ex­tro­verts can be­come in­flu­encers if they know how to make their per­son­al­ity work in their favour.

INTROVERT, EX­TRO­VERT OR IN BE­TWEEN?

In­tro­verts are keen ob­servers and se- lec­tive speak­ers. They of­ten sit back and lis­ten so have well-con­sid­ered and strate­gic ideas. For in­tro­verts, the big­gest bar­rier to be­ing in­flu­en­tial in the work­place is ef­fec­tive com­mu­ni­ca­tion.

Ex­tro­verts can find it eas­ier to be in­flu­en­tial in the work­place as they have a stronger pres­ence. They are of­ten out­go­ing, so­cially con­fi­dent and like to talk so they can get their mes­sage across. To be more in­flu­en­tial, ex­tro­verts must also learn to be great lis­ten­ers.

TIPS FOR IN­TRO­VERTS

To over­come bar­ri­ers to in­flu­enc­ing oth­ers, it’s es­sen­tial work­ers recog­nise and un­der­stand their be­hav­iours, Chan­dler Ma­cleod Group busi­ness psy- chol­o­gist Steve Ben­netts says. By un­der­stand­ing how it af­fects oth­ers, they in­crease their emo­tional in­tel­li­gence, which can ben­e­fit their ca­reer.

In­tro­verts should make space in their day for work­place ac­tiv­i­ties that in­volve other peo­ple as fos­ter­ing re­la­tion­ships helps them de­velop com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills.

They will of­ten take a step back be­fore in­volv­ing them­selves in con­ver­sa­tions and Ben­netts says they should ask them­selves if they are giv­ing off sig­nals that they are not in­ter­ested in en­gag­ing.

In­tro­verts should try para­phras­ing what has been said and use this as a launch pad to share their own ideas.

TIPS FOR EX­TRO­VERTS

Ex­tro­verts need to watch their body lan­guage and that of their col­leagues. Do their col­leagues like to be touched on the shoul­der or hugged? This can be an is­sue for some peo­ple and may lead to them dis­en­gag­ing from the con­ver­sa­tion.

Un­der­stand­ing how oth­ers en­gage in con­ver­sa­tions will help to steer the dis­cus­sion in the right di­rec­tion.

Ex­tro­verts can build re­flec­tive listening by seek­ing to un­der­stand what is be­ing said and re­peat­ing back their un­der­stand­ing of the idea to show they have un­der­stood.

THIS AR­TI­CLE FIRST AP­PEARED ON SEEK AD­VICE & TIPS

Pic­ture: BOB BARKER

NO SHY­ING AWAY Ac­coun­tant, chief ex­ec­u­tive, speaker and au­thor Melissa Browne ad­dresses the chal­lenges of be­ing an introvert.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.