BEAT­ING THE COM­PE­TI­TION

IN A COM­PET­I­TIVE JOB MAR­KET, WHAT CAN HELP MY AP­PLI­CA­TION TO STAND OUT FROM THE REST?

The Courier-Mail - Career One - - Front Page - email ques­tions to ca­reer­s_qs@news.com.au

EX­PE­RI­ENCED DAR­REN BUCHANAN MAN­AG­ING DI­REC­TOR, HAYS QUEENS­LAND

Rather than a CV filled with de­tails of your pre­vi­ous du­ties and re­spon­si­bil­i­ties – points that could eas­ily have come from your job de­scrip­tion – pro­vide proof that you did your pre­vi­ous jobs well. For ex­am­ple, in­stead of writ­ing that you man­aged a team you could note ‘I united and mo­ti­vated a team of five un­der­per­form­ers. Af­ter one year our cus­tomer ser­vice scores had in­creased 55 per cent’. Or rather than writ­ing that you al­ways achieved your tar­get goals, try spec­i­fy­ing the av­er­age per­cent­age by which you sur­passed them. It is this proof that will help your CV stand out.

MID-CA­REER AN­DREA DAVEY CHIEF OP­ER­AT­ING OF­FI­CER, EM­PLOY­MENT OF­FICE

It is im­por­tant that you stick to a clean, mod­ern and easy-to-read for­mat that at­tracts the em­ployer and doesn’t over­whelm them. Put time and ef­fort into mak­ing each ap­pli­ca­tion you sub­mit care­fully tai­lored to the job ad you’re re­spond­ing to. It is your check­list for the skills and ex­pe­ri­ence you need to men­tion in your cover let­ter and re­sume. Use ex­plicit ex­am­ples of why you’d be a good fit for the role and only use rel­e­vant ex­am­ples. Most im­por­tantly – make sure you don’t stand out for the wrong rea­sons. Spell­ing er­rors and ty­pos can show a lack of at­ten­tion to de­tail.

UP & COM­ING JULIE FORD SE­NIOR EX­EC­U­TIVE CON­SUL­TANT, McARTHUR

This is the hard­est part of a job search and where you have the least con­trol, es­pe­cially with em­ploy­ers us­ing tech­nol­ogy to screen ap­pli­ca­tions. Ap­pli­ca­tions that stand out are the most rel­e­vant to the role. Key­words are vi­tally im­por­tant so en­sure you are us­ing the cor­rect ter­mi­nol­ogy to de­scribe re­spon­si­bil­i­ties. How­ever, we need to see not only what you are re­spon­si­ble for, but more im­por­tantly what you have achieved – what are your mea­sur­able re­sults? It’s good to in­ject your per­son­al­ity into the ap­pli­ca­tion – a short state­ment about who you are and what your goals are.

THE EX­PERT DR NERIDA HILLBERG DI­REC­TOR OF PSY­CHOL­OGY, FER­RIS MAN­AGE­MENT CON­SUL­TANTS

In my opin­ion, three things set a great ap­pli­ca­tion apart from a good one. First, an er­ror-free CV and ap­pli­ca­tion let­ter that are well-pre­sented, con­cise and co­gent. Sec­ond, com­pelling and quan­ti­fied state­ments of how you not only meet, but ex­ceed the key se­lec­tion cri­te­ria. Third, ev­i­dence you’ve done your home­work on the com­pany you are ap­ply­ing to. Com­pa­nies want peo­ple who share their val­ues and goals. Ex­am­ine and present the ar­eas you’d fo­cus on in the role. Look at the po­ten­tial value-add you could bring to the busi­ness.

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