The juice on pink

This pair of colours is easy to live with and sure to put a smile on your face, writes Robyn Wil­lis

The Daily Telegraph (Sydney) - Home - - TREND - More De­signer Rugs, de­sign­errugs.com.au; Ma­te­ri­alised; ma­te­ri­alised.com.au; Sage & Clare, sage­and­clare.com

Stick around long enough and you’ll see the same trends mak­ing a re­turn ap­pear­ance. Orange and pink last made an im­pact in the early 2000s, driven by an in­ter­est in all as­pects of In­dian de­sign. The colour of marigolds, which are a sym­bol of peace and pros­per­ity in In­dian cul­ture, orange went head-to-head with bold and feel-good pink, which snuck out of the bed­room and shows no signs of re­turn­ing.

While they were equally vi­brant the last time they teamed up, this time around there’s a lot more vari­a­tion, from burnt orange teamed with soft mil­len­nial pink to fus­cia pink work­ing in with softer peach shades.

Dive into colour

As with any strong colour, it pays to do a lit­tle plan­ning be­fore you dive in. The beauty of these new shades is that they are less true and clear colours. In­stead, they are more likely to veer to the ‘dirt­ier’ end of the spec­trum, which can make them eas­ier to live with be­cause they feel a lit­tle softer rather than scream­ing for at­ten­tion. But if your phi­los­o­phy is more akin to “‘he who hes­i­tates is lost”, dive right in with a bold wall­pa­pered fea­ture wall.

Tex­tiles com­pany Ma­te­ri­alised has just re­leased its lat­est range from the in­ex­haustible Florence Broad­hurst back cat­a­logue. With just a nod to the 1970s hip­pie move­ment in the UK, the pat­tern and colour com­bi­na­tion is at once retro and to­tally in keep­ing with the pop­u­lar tribal in­te­rior dec­o­rat­ing look gain­ing trac­tion re­cently.

Use the pat­tern to cre­ate a pal­ette for the room, with small doses of ma­genta pink and ochre teamed with nat­u­ral ma­te­ri­als like linen and jute as a neu­tral back­drop.

In­deed, this pair of colours is a sur­pris­ingly good match with the colours of na­ture, from earthy mush­room and soft ter­ra­cotta through to the lush greens of the trop­ics.

Al­ter­na­tively, make a bold state­ment and team pink and orange with a white in­te­rior. De­signer Rugs has re­leased fash­ion de­signer Akira Iso­gawa’s third range of floor rugs, named Hi­rameki (or in­spi­ra­tion), in­clud­ing a show­stop­per pat­tern in deep pink and apri­cot.

Again, keep­ing the rest of the room de­lib­er­ately clean and white will let the colours sing while cre­at­ing a trop­i­cal re­sort feel to the space.

Cush­ion­ing the blow

If the thought of com­mit­ting to a whole wall or a large scale floor rug is a lit­tle over­whelm­ing, pink and orange soft fur­nish­ings are a great al­ter­na­tive.

The look is low-key tribal with hints of no­madic cul­ture thrown in. This style em­braces tas­sels, wo­ven cush­ions and quilted bed­ding for a re­laxed ap­proach that is both warm and invit­ing.

Whichever look you pre­fer, this is a colour pair­ing guar­an­teed to lift your mood.

This rug from Akira Iso­gawa's third col­lab­o­ra­tion with De­signer Rugs teams deep pink with apri­cot.

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