POCKET MONEY

THEIR FA­THER IS THE CEO OF ONE OF QUEENS­LAND’S BIG­GEST RESIDENTIAL DE­VEL­OP­ERS AND RACHEL AND CAITLIN TREA­SURE DREAM OF BUILD­ING AN EM­PIRE OF THEIR OWN

The Gold Coast Bulletin - Gold Coast Eye - - FEATURE - WORDS : EMILY MAC­DON­ALD

When most girls get told to clean their rooms they see a chore but when you’re the daugh­ters of a prom­i­nent busi­ness­man you see an op­por­tu­nity.

While it was mum Deb who asked 21-yearold Queens­land Univer­sity of Tech­nol­ogy law stu­dent Rachel Trea­sure and her sis­ter Caitlin, 18, who is in Grade 12 at All Saints Angli­can School, to clean out their wardrobes it was their fa­ther Craig who inspired them.

“I thought, OK I’ll do it but I want to sell these clothes,” Rachel says.

“But the only way to do it is on places like Face­book or Gumtree and it’s so in­ef­fi­cient.

“We’d al­ways joked with Dad about busi­ness ideas.

“We were like, ‘Dad we’ve got a name, we’re go­ing to make an app and it’s go­ing to be awe­some’.”

But when your fa­ther is the CEO and man­ag­ing di­rec­tor of Villa World, start­ing a busi­ness isn’t a mat­ter of hap­haz­ardly throw­ing to­gether a few ideas.

Af­ter com­ing up with the con­cept be­hind new app Clothes­line, which al­ready has more than 1000 reg­is­tered users look­ing to buy and sell preloved cloth­ing, the sis­ters set about out­sourc­ing tech­ni­cal ex­per­tise to IT stu­dents Nate Zerk and Michael McCle­naghan.

Next they penned a busi­ness plan to im­press their fi­nan­cial back­ers – their own dad and Rachel’s boyfriend Wil­liam’s fa­ther and Gil­bert and Suther­land owner Neil.

They’ve trade­marked the name and brain­stormed new fea­tures, which will be rolled out pe­ri­od­i­cally.

Fol­low­ing seven months of de­vel­op­ment and a cou­ple of stake­holder meet­ings where poor Craig was con­fronted with the brunt of the Trea­sure ne­go­ti­at­ing gene, the app was launched late last month.

“We had a few hec­tic dis­cus­sions with Dad but it was all in good spirit,” Rachel says.

“We con­vinced Dad that be­cause of our sweat eq­uity, the year of un­paid work we would put in, we should be able to in­crease the value of our shares.”

Since then Caitlin has used her so­cial skills to pro­mote the busi­ness.

“I do a lot of mar­ket­ing in terms of In­sta­gram and Face­book­ing stuff,” Caitlin says.

“I pester all my friends to sign up and we had a lit­tle launch party to get the word out.

“Ev­ery­one has been re­ally sup­port­ive and now I’ve got our friends tag­ging us on Face­book, which is great.”

The app’s early re­sults have been en­cour­ag­ing.

There are cur­rently 600 items of cloth­ing listed on Clothes­line and 20 sales have been closed.

The busi­ness re­ceives a 15 per cent com­mis­sion from each sale, which is for now be­ing rein­vested into mar­ket­ing the app.

As for Deb, the un­know­ing cat­a­lyst for it all, she’s happy to let the rest of her fam­ily bask in their latest busi­ness ven­ture.

“Craig will come home and say, ‘Well Rachel what’s hap­pen­ing with Clothes­line?’,” Deb says.

“It’s the main topic of con­ver­sa­tion in our house.” And the best part of all? The girls’ wardrobes have never looked ti­dier.

“WE CON­VINCED DAD THAT BE­CAUSE OF OUR SWEAT EQ­UITY ... WE SHOULD BE ABLE TO IN­CREASE OUR SHARES.”

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