BOOST YOUR WORK­OUT

IT CAN BE EASY TO GET CAR­RIED AWAY BY SHELVES LINED WITH SUPERCHARGED SUP­PLE­MENTS, BUT WILL THEY RE­ALLY MAKE A DIF­FER­ENCE TO YOUR RE­SULTS?

The Gold Coast Bulletin - Gold Coast Eye - - FEATURE -

Alot of my clients ask if they “need” sup­ple­ments to achieve their goals or get there faster. I’m glad they ask, be­cause sup­ple­ments can be ben­e­fi­cial, but they can also be ex­pen­sive, overused and some­times detri­men­tal to health and fit­ness goals.

The pri­mary rea­son to take sup­ple­ments is to pre­vent or cure any nu­tri­ent, vi­ta­min, min­eral or amino acid de­fi­cien­cies that you may have due to hereditary or life­style fac­tors.

When you ex­er­cise or even per­form daily ac­tiv­i­ties that in­volve ex­er­tion, your body re­quires a cer­tain amount of nu­tri­ents in your diet for ma­jor func­tions. So, if your daily ex­er­cise or phys­i­cal ex­er­tion in­creases, you must in­crease your nu­tri­ent in­take to cater for th­ese changes and help you per­form at an op­ti­mal level. If you can­not con­sume the nu­tri­ents re­quired, this is when sup­ple­ments may play a role in im­prov­ing your health and achiev­ing your goals.

But how do you find the right sup­ple­ments for you? My ad­vice is to seek pro­fes­sional ad­vice. A sim­ple blood test can iden­tify any ar­eas where you are de­fi­cient, so that way you won’t waste time and money guess­ing what you need.

If it’s pro­tein pow­ders or sim­i­lar prod­ucts, you’ll still need to con­sult a pro­fes­sional but I’d rec­om­mend a trusted per­sonal trainer or nu­tri­tion­ist, not some­one who is go­ing to make a com­mis­sion from sell­ing you some­thing.

You should also re­search, re­search, re­search. Find out what nu­tri­ents and vi­ta­mins help with par­tic­u­lar is­sues, for ex­am­ple, if you’re feel­ing low in en­ergy, it could be an iron or B12 de­fi­ciency, if your skin is break­ing out zinc can be help­ful. Omega 3 is proven ef­fec­tive for joint health; ev­ery­thing has its place.

If you’ve ever been to a sup­ple­ment store, you would prob­a­bly agree that it is very over­whelm­ing, with thou­sands of dif­fer­ent op­tions lined up on the shelves from the floor to the ceil­ing, promis­ing you weight loss, mus­cle gain, fat loss, ex­tra en­ergy, greater strength — the list goes on.

Many sup­ple­ment com­pa­nies fill their prod­ucts with a big list of in­gre­di­ents so they can pro­mote all the ben­e­fits that a par­tic­u­lar in­gre­di­ent may pro­vide, but this can di­lute the po­tency.

The taste of a sup­ple­ment can also play a part in your de­ci­sion — be very cau­tious of the sweet­en­ers some com­pa­nies use.

If a prod­uct tastes too good to be true, there is a very good chance it is. Avoid any sup­ple­ments that con­tain ar­ti­fi­cial sweet­en­ers such as dex­trose, su­cralose, corn syrup and as­par­tame as th­ese in­gre­di­ents could do more harm than good.

JOEL BRAD­FORD Joel is a per­sonal trainer, health and per­for­mance coach and owner of JB Health and Per­for­mance. He holds a Cert III and IV in Fit­ness, Strength and Con­di­tion­ing, Ad­vanced Nutri­tion.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.