BIT­TER SWEET TRUTH

The Gold Coast Bulletin - Gold Coast Eye - - PEOPLE EYE - LYN GREEN

THINK YOU’RE DO­ING YOUR­SELF A FAVOUR BY CHOOS­ING A SMOOTHIE BOWL OVER A DOUGH­NUT? THESE SO CALLED HEALTH FOODS AREN’T AL­WAYS WHAT THEY SEEM

A regis­tered nu­tri­tion­ist and F45 Train­ing’s Global 8-Week Chal­lenge di­rec­tor, Lyn also holds a Bach­e­lor in Health Science (Nu­tri­tional Medicine) and a Cer­tifi­cate 3 and 4 in Fit­ness. READ MORE AT f45chal­lenge.com

From ve­g­an­ism and no-sugar di­ets to con­sum­ing ex­ces­sive amounts of quinoa, goji ber­ries and muesli, we’re all jump­ing on­board the health food trend as a way to lead health­ier, bet­ter lives. Ev­ery­one from school teach­ers to tradies and work­ing busi­ness­men is en­joy­ing their smashed av­o­cado toast and dou­ble - shot three-quar­ter latte on soy milk. It’s funny to think that there was a time when eat­ing healthy felt like a pu­n­ish­ment. But the bit­ter­sweet truth is that not all these “healthy” foods are ac­tu­ally very healthy for you. Don’t be fooled by la­bels such as “or­ganic”, “all nat­u­ral” or “no added sugar”. Many health foods are jam packed with honey or ar­ti­fi­cial sweet­en­ers that give them more calo­ries and sug­ars than tra­di­tional foods. Here’s some com­mon cul­prits to avoid at your next week­end brunch or trip to the su­per­mar­ket:

SMOOTHIE BOWLS

These In­sta-wor­thy bowls can pack up to 490 calo­ries and 67g of sugar. That’s be­cause many smoothie bowls found in juice shops and cafes are full of fruit juices, purees and sweet­ened yo­ghurt. By adding a hit of pro­tein into the bowl, you can sig­nif­i­cantly re­duce the spike of glu­cose in the blood. By hav­ing pro­tein, car­bo­hy­drate di­ges­tion and ab­sorp­tion is slowed, which leads to re­duced lev­els of in­sulin (known as the fat-stor­ing hor­mone).

AGAVE NEC­TAR

Hailed as the nat­u­ral sub­sti­tute for honey and sugar, agave nec­tar is of­ten billed as a health­ier al­ter­na­tive due to its low gly­caemic in­dex. In truth, agave con­tains 60 calo­ries per ta­ble­spoon, and at least 80-90 per cent more fruc­tose than white sugar. Next time, try sub­sti­tut­ing agave for ste­via, which is a plant con­tain­ing zero calo­ries that doesn’t af­fect glu­cose and in­sulin lev­els after con­sump­tion. Be­ing 200 times sweeter than sugar, it is the per­fect al­ter­na­tive.

GLUTEN-FREE SNACKS

Many gluten-free snacks avail­able in the health food aisle at your lo­cal su­per­mar­ket con­tain hid­den sug­ars, mak­ing them less healthy than snacks that con­tain gluten. If you are coeliac or gluten in­tol­er­ant, check the in­gre­di­ent list on the back of food prod­ucts to en­sure there is no added sugar or sweet­en­ers.

GRA­NOLA

A cup of crunchy top­ping can av­er­age a whop­ping 597 calo­ries, 28g of fat and 24g of sugar. Buck­i­nis are a health­ier re­place­ment. Used reg­u­larly in the F45 8-Week Chal­lenge, buck­i­nis are a rich source of pro­tein, es­sen­tial min­er­als and B vi­ta­mins. They’ll add crunch to your smooth­ies, ce­re­als and por­ridge with­out in­creas­ing sugar lev­els.

JUICES

Juic­ing ex­tracts all the fi­bre, vi­ta­mins, min­er­als and nu­tri­ents that whole foods con­tain. The sugar fruc­tose, which is nat­u­rally found in fruits, will raise your glu­cose lev­els more after di­ges­tion with the re­moval of fi­bre. Fi­bre is a car­bo­hy­drate that is not bro­ken down by the body and ab­sorbed, there­fore it keeps you feel­ing fuller for longer and re­duces blood glu­cose lev­els. Smooth­ies are a bet­ter al­ter­na­tive so you don’t miss out on fi­bre, vi­ta­mins and nu­tri­ents.

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