SPIN KING

DANCE MU­SIC MAE­STRO DAVID GUETTA TOUCHES DOWN FOR CREAM­FIELDS

The Gold Coast Bulletin - Play Magazine - - FRONT PAGE -

FRENCH Dj/pro­ducer David Guetta roped in his young son to help mix Re­peat, the track he recorded with singer Jessie J.

‘‘Of course he didn’t do it right so I cor­rected it, but he now thinks it’s his record,’’ Guetta says.

Such is the de­mand for the 43-yearold’s thump­ing pro­duc­tion skills that Guetta Jr could well be called on again.

His ‘‘papa’’ – who head­lines the Cream­fields dance mu­sic fes­ti­val at Parklands Show­grounds this week­end – has been re­spon­si­ble for a slew of global hits in the past two years, in­clud­ing 10 Aus­tralian Top 20 sin­gles and two No. 1 hits.

While he’s en­joy­ing plenty of chart suc­cess with his cur­rent re­lease, the dou­ble al­bum Noth­ing But The Beat, Guetta’s star truly soared af­ter writ­ing The Black Eyes Peas song I’ve Got A Feel­ing, one of the big­gest-sell­ing dig­i­tal tracks ever, with more than 5.5 mil­lion downloads.

Guetta has since pro­duced records with Ri­hanna, Akon, Snoop Dogg, Madonna, Kelis, Usher, Chris Brown, Flo Rida, Nicki Mi­naj, Taio Cruz, Jen­nifer Hud­son, Lu­dacris and more.

‘‘I in­vite them into my world and we cre­ate to­gether,’’ he says.

‘‘I love mu­sic that makes you dance, but at the same time makes you want to cry, emo­tional mu­sic that still had the drive.’’

For all his chart dom­i­na­tion, Guetta seems re­mark­ably grounded and talks about how fame could dis­ap­pear any time. He lives in the mo­ment and re­fuses to let suc­cess go to his head.

‘‘I wasn’t al­ways fa­mous and if I’d asked artists then they wouldn’t have picked up their phones be­cause no one knew who I was,’’ he says.

‘‘It just so hap­pened that my first big pro­duc­tion was for The Black Eyed Peas . . . and that was a pretty big start. Now peo­ple pick up the phone.’’

Guetta iden­ti­fied early the po­ten­tial to fuse elec­tro and ur­ban mu­sic, to make house mu­sic the new hip hop, a sound rapidly repli­cated around the world and now dom­i­nat­ing the charts.

By earn­ing the slav­ish re­spect of pop mu­sic’s elite, Guetta has rev­o­lu­tionised the idea of the su­per­star DJ to be­come the big­gest-sell­ing for­mer club jock of all time. So why him? ‘‘Pro­duc­tion has be­come re­ally im­por­tant over the years,’’ he says.

‘‘You can be­come fa­mous with your DJ skills, but it’s limited to a cer­tain level. ‘‘That was the dif­fer­ence.’’

The term ‘‘su­per­star DJ’’ was not coined when Guetta be­gan cut­ting his teeth on the Parisian club cir­cuit back in the late ’80s.

He rem­i­nisces about a venue where he played in the base­ment and mon­i­tored the crowd by peer­ing at their feet through a gap.

An­other had him spin­ning records from a sep­a­rate room.

‘‘It’s crazy to think it to­day, but there was no fame or money or even a stage for the DJ then; you just did it for the pas­sion and the love,’’ he says.

‘‘I do this to­day for the same rea­sons, to party with the peo­ple and share my pas­sion for the mu­sic,’’ he says.

‘‘My life is not so much dif­fer­ent now; it’s just in­stead of play­ing to 500 peo­ple I play to 20,000 and in­stead of prac­tis­ing my mix­ing I pro­duce records with peo­ple like Akon and Nicki Mi­naj.’’

Guetta is de­ter­mined to stay grounded, es­pe­cially for the sake of his two chil­dren aged seven and four. Grow­ing up with mod­est means en­cour­aged him to fight for his life’s goals and he wants the same for his kids.

‘‘Some­times they ask for candy and I tell them ‘no it’s too ex­pen­sive we can’t af­ford it’ be­cause I want them to feel like money’s not com­ing so eas­ily.’’

Guetta Jr need not worry too much about go­ing hun­gry.

He can al­ways de­mand his slice of Jessie J’s Re­peat.

David Guetta

David Guetta, Above and Be­yond, Dirty South, Giuseppe Ot­ta­viani, Bombs Away and more play Cream­fields, at Parklands Show­grounds, on Sun­day.

Club­bing, Page 40

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