DUNIES SAND­ING SO GOOD

Bris­bane’s way­ward ‘dunecore stoner pop’ trio Dune Rats find they have less time to bum around at the beach when at home th­ese days

The Gold Coast Bulletin - Play Magazine - - LIVE & LOUD - KANE YOUNG

Ac­cord­ing to the old say­ing, idle hands are the devil’s tools. So it is good that Bris­bane “dunecore stoner pop” trio and gen­eral mis­chief-mak­ers Dune Rats are so busy th­ese days.

In fact, they are pos­si­bly the most pro­duc­tive beach-bum slack­ers in Aus­tralia.

“If we’re ever at home and there’s noth­ing to do, we get bored re­ally eas­ily. The thing to com­bat that is to write songs,” bass player Brett Jan­sch says.

“We should al­ways be do­ing some­thing. I feel like when we’re just sit­ting around that’s a point­less waste of time.

‘‘We could be try­ing to make bet­ter and bet­ter songs and then put out another al­bum, which would hope­fully al­low us to keep on tour­ing.”

Since re­leas­ing their de­but EP Sexy Beach in early 2011, Dune Rats – Jan­sch, Danny Beusa (gui­tar, vo­cals) and BC Michaels (drums, vo­cals) – have been trav­el­ling the globe as self-styled punk rock Pied Pipers, tak­ing their wild live show as far afield as the US, South Africa, China, In­done­sia, Malaysia, Canada and Sin­ga­pore.

All the while they have also been sell­ing out con­certs across Aus­tralia and sup­port­ing the likes of Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graf­fiti, The Hives, Chil­dren Col­lide and The Vines.

The trio took time out from their hec­tic sched­ule ear­lier last year to write their lon­gawaited self-ti­tled de­but al­bum, which they recorded in Mel­bourne with pro­ducer Woody An­ni­son and re­leased on June 1.

“The trav­el­ling as­pect, learn­ing about cul­ture, that’s what we all feed off and love,” Jan­sch says.

“But in record­ing you see the re­wards of spend­ing time with your friends and writ­ing songs and play­ing mu­sic to­gether. You can lis­ten back to it and be su­per-sat­is­fied about the process you went through to do it.

“We got the job done, with our friends, on our own merit – we paid for the record­ing our­selves, did it all of our own ac­cord – so I’m su­per proud of what we’ve achieved in get­ting the record out.”

The al­bum fea­tures the ra­dio favourites Funny Guy, Dalai Lama Big Ba­nana Mar­i­juana and the lat­est Dune Rats sin­gle Su­per­man, an ode to “the lord and lady hell­men” who go the hard­est at the band’s “rau­cous” live gigs.

There is one in ev­ery group of friends – and in the Dune Rats’ crew ap­par­ently it is Jan­sch’s mother.

“Mum had been revving up to crowd-surf for so long,” Jan­sch says.

“She’s al­ways at our shows, and in Bris­bane (in June) she was like, ‘It’s the last show of the tour, I’m gonna do it’.

“She ran up on stage and jumped in, and went straight through the crowd, smoked her­self, ended up break­ing her col­lar­bone.

“She didn’t tell any­one. She was just cruis­ing around and then all of a sud­den she was gone. I called her up like, ‘Mum, where are you?’, and she was re­ally re­luc­tant to tell me that she was in ca­su­alty at the hos­pi­tal. So that song is for my mum, she’s the su­per­woman.

“I don’t know if it’s a good story or a bad story, it makes her sound like a crazy drunk.

‘‘But I think she just loves BC and Danny as much as she loves me, and it def­i­nitely puts a smile on her dial when­ever we play.”

The Dunies cer­tainly know how to have a good time – there is no doubt about that.

But there is a se­ri­ous side lurk­ing un­der­neath the party an­tics – even if Jan­sch is not quite ready to grow up just yet.

“But if the band was ever to come across some money we’d all want to invest it and be smart with it – we’re not wasters and I never want to be la­belled a waster,’’ he says.

“At the shows ev­ery­one’s hav­ing a good time and we all get pissed. But the next morn­ing it’s al­ways about how we can stay on-point, be happy and get bet­ter as a band, that’s for sure.”

Ill-ad­vised it might have been, but even a band mem­ber’s mother could not help but crowd-surf to the Dune Rats

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