Men­tal health gets a lunch lift

The Observer - - NEWS - MATT TAY­LOR Matt.Tay­lor@glad­sto­neob­server.com.au

...IT IS NOT JUST AIMED AT ONE CUL­TURE OR ONE SOCIO-ECO­NOMIC BACK­GROUND, IT CAN HIT ANY­ONE AT ANY TIME. SHANNARA EMMERTON, BRIDGES HEALTH AND COM­MU­NITY CARE

A COL­LAB­O­RA­TION headed by Wel­com­ing In­ter­cul­tural Neigh­bours paved the way for Glad­stone res­i­dents to learn more about men­tal health yes­ter­day.

The or­gan­i­sa­tion teamed with Art Mat­ters @ Cre­ative Glad­stone to present art and lunch at its new In­clu­sion Cen­tre as part of Queens­land Men­tal Health Week.

Ex­ec­u­tive of­fi­cer of WIN, Natalia Muszkat said it was an op­por­tu­nity to col­lab­o­rate with other com­mu­nity or­gan­i­sa­tions to build aware­ness sur­round­ing men­tal health.

“We’re try­ing to bring to­gether more aware­ness to peo­ple about men­tal health, es­pe­cially peo­ple from cul­tur­ally and lin­guis­ti­cally di­verse back­grounds,” she said.

“We’re try­ing to en­cour­age them to look af­ter their men­tal health and give them sup­port in re­la­tion to the chal­lenges they face when they move to a new coun­try or re­gion.

“We re­ceived a grant to pay for the lunch and some re­sources, and we are en­gag­ing other not for profit or­gan­i­sa­tions – for ex­am­ple to run the art ac­tiv­i­ties.”

The lunch fea­tured a num­ber of ac­tiv­i­ties for fam­i­lies, with in­for­mal presentations, art and mu­si­cal ac­tiv­i­ties for chil­dren.

It also pro­vided an op­por­tu­nity for at­ten­dees to speak to other or­gan­i­sa­tions for in­for­ma­tion about re­sources and ser­vices avail­able in the Glad­stone Re­gion.

Project lead at Bridges Health and Com­mu­nity Care, Shannara Emmerton said it was im­por­tant to break down the bar­ri­ers and stigma sur­round­ing men­tal health.

“It’s im­por­tant that ev­ery­body un­der­stands what men­tal health is, how to look af­ter their men­tal health and how to look af­ter them­selves so that their men­tal health is im­proved,” she said.

“With men­tal health, it is not just aimed at one cul­ture or one socio-eco­nomic back­ground, it can hit any­one at any time.

“We see peo­ple from all dif­fer­ent sorts of back­grounds, lives and re­la­tion­ships who need as­sis­tance some­times, and that’s OK.”

The vol­un­teers from Art Mat­ters were pleased to be part of the event.

“We’re run­ning art ses­sions get­ting peo­ple to look at mind­ful­ness,” vol­un­teer Sharon Sch­midt said.

“The ter­mi­nol­ogy of Art Mat­ters means it’s im­por­tant to your­self as well as across the com­mu­nity, and ev­ery­body en­joys and can do art.

“It can be re­ally cathar­tic and can build self-aware­ness.”

FEEL­ING THE BEAT: Quentin Ben­nett was tak­ing part in some of the mu­si­cal ac­tiv­i­ties for chil­dren.

Leanne Pa­trick from Com­mu­ni­ties for Chil­dren was work­ing on this art piece with some of the chil­dren who at­tended.

El­iza Walker from Sing and Grow was con­duct­ing a mu­si­cal class usu­ally de­signed for chil­dren and par­ents.

Shikira Ray­mond from Com­mu­ni­ties for Chil­dren work­ing on one of the art pieces.

Pho­tos: Matt Tay­lor GLA121018MENT

Wel­com­ing In­ter­cul­tural Neigh­bours put on art and lunch for Men­tal Health Week.

Wil­son Pakalu, CQ Ru­ral Health and Shannara Emmerton, Bridges Health and Com­mu­nity Care spoke at the event.

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