Fes­ti­val sheds light upon city

Hun­dreds of peo­ple cel­e­brate ninth an­nual Di­wali event

The Queensland Times - - SENIOR MATTERS - WAYNE MC­DON­NELL

MORE than 400 hun­dred peo­ple crowded into d’Arcy Doyle Place last Sun­day evening to dine un­der the stars and cel­e­brate the ninth an­nual Di­wali Fes­ti­val.

Di­wali got un­der way as the sun dropped be­hind St Paul’s Angli­can Church perched on the hill over­look­ing d’Arcy Doyle Place and the cool evening breeze blew in.

Di­wali is the fes­ti­val of light and is the most sig­nif­i­cant fes­ti­val in In­dia and is cel­e­brated ev­ery au­tumn in the north­ern hemi­sphere and spring in the south­ern hemi­sphere.

One of the most pop­u­lar fes­ti­vals of Hin­duism, Di­wali sym­bol­ises the spir­i­tual “vic­tory of light over dark­ness, good over evil and knowl­edge over ig­no­rance”.

It is a fes­ti­val of spe­cial sig­nif­i­cance in In­dia.

As day turned into night, d’Arcy Doyle Place be­came a colour­ful fes­tive scene, with lights dress­ing up the trees sur­round­ing the grassed area. He­lium bal­loons teth­ered to the tem­po­rary fence added colour

‘‘ DI­WALI IS THE FES­TI­VAL OF LIGHT AND IS THE MOST SIG­NIF­I­CANT FES­TI­VAL IN IN­DIA AND IS CEL­E­BRATED EV­ERY AU­TUMN IN THE NORTH­ERN HEMI­SPHERE AND SPRING IN THE SOUTH­ERN HEMI­SPHERE.

and spec­ta­cle with adorn­ments of small fairy lights.

Some pa­trons dressed for the oc­ca­sion and wore colour­ful saris and tra­di­tional In­dian wear. Oth­ers wore more in­for­mal clothes more suit­able to Aus­tralian sum­mers. But what­ever the clothes, pa­trons were happy to be there to cel­e­brate Di­wali.

Henna paint­ing was a very pop­u­lar ac­tiv­ity dur­ing the evening. The artists do­ing the henna paint­ing were kept very busy all evening with pa­trons queu­ing to have a henna tat­too painted on their hand.

An­other pop­u­lar ac­tiv­ity at Di­wali is the Bol­ly­wood danc­ing and can th­ese peo­ple dance. It is quiet ex­haust­ing watch­ing them per­form.

Their dress is colour­ful, the dance very en­er­getic and the vi­sion ex­hil­a­rat­ing. And the crowd can’t wait to join in dur­ing the Bol­ly­wood danc­ing work­shop; it is a mag­nif­i­cent spec­ta­cle.

Raj Sharma and his fam­ily and staff of the In­dian Me­hfil restau­rant have been or­gan­is­ing this fes­ti­val for nine years, bring­ing to­gether dif­fer­ent cul­tures in cel­e­bra­tion of what each has to of­fer.

Ac­cord­ing to Mr Sharma, Di­wali is about be­long­ing in the com­mu­nity.

He said he and his fam­ily have made Ip­swich home. His chil­dren go to school in Ip­swich, his busi­ness is in Ip­swich and he sup­ports the com­mu­nity where he can. This is why he has or­gan­ised Di­wali to al­low the Ip­swich com­mu­nity to share in a cul­ture, to share in dif­fer­ent food and to share in bring­ing light into the com­mu­nity.

Aus­tralians, ex­cept our first na­tion’s peo­ple, have all come from dif­fer­ent coun­tries dat­ing back gen­er­a­tions.

They have brought with them their cul­tures and won­der­ful food that is shared in many dif­fer­ent forms.

And, as Mr Sharma says, re­gard­less of where you have come from, or how far back your an­ces­tors came to this coun­try, you have con­tributed to this mix of “Aus­tralian­ism”, along with the cul­ture and food from our Indige­nous pop­u­la­tion.

The Ip­swich Com­mu­nity can look for­ward to the10th Di­wali Fes­ti­val at about the same time in 2019.

To Mr Sharma and his fam­ily at In­dian Me­hfil Restau­rant, con­grat­u­la­tions on an­other suc­cess­ful Di­wali Fes­ti­val.

Photo: Rob Wil­liams

CELBBRATION: Di­wali Fes­tiva sym­bol­ises the spir­i­tual vic­tory of light over dark­ness, good over evil and knowl­edge over ig­no­rance.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.