TOUCH FOOT­BALL

MARIKKI WATEGO, 26

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - Body and Soul - - FITNESS -

E arly morn­ing starts are the norm for this Bris­bane-based lawyer, who started play­ing at school and has since been on the 2015 World Cup-win­ning Aus­tralian Women’s Open side and co-cap­tained the Indige­nous All Stars team. “As touch foot­ball isn’t a pro­fes­sional sport, everyone on my team also has an­other job,” she says. “Be­ing able to bal­ance the two, know­ing when you need to give and take, is some­thing I’ve learnt along the way.” Who should try it: “Any­one who en­joys team sport. I en­joy the ca­ma­raderie – you’re work­ing for some­body else, not just your­self. I also re­ally en­joy the strat­egy; the beauty of touch is that it’s quite a men­tal game.” What you’ll learn: “Be­ing able to com­mu­ni­cate ef­fec­tively on the sport­ing field – you have to be able to take that into the work­place as well. Work­ing to­wards a com­mon goal is an­other thing. There are def­i­nitely trans­fer­able skills and play­ing sport means I’m bet­ter equipped for a pro­fes­sional ca­reer.” How to get in­volved: “Touch Foot­ball Aus­tralia is the main or­gan­i­sa­tion for com­pe­ti­tions – there are ju­nior and se­nior ones across Aus­tralia.” Visit touch­foot­ball.com.au

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