PLAT­INUM SHOP­PING TIP

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - Escape - - YOUR VIEW -

Most tourists know about the MBK Cen­ter in Bangkok for good shop­ping. What they might not know is Thai lo­cals pre­fer to buy clothes at the Plat­inum Fash­ion Mall. This mall has a bet­ter range of cloth­ing and you can get an even bet­ter deal by buy­ing mul­ti­ple items. This mall is also well known for re­ally cheap, high qual­ity lug­gage. If you’re keen, I sug­gest you travel to Thai­land with a light carry-on back­pack and then get your­self some lug­gage to fill up with gifts/sou­venirs for the trip back home. VAN HUYNH

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TRAIN TRAVEL

When trav­el­ling on the Eurostar from Europe to the UK you can buy your Oys­ter trav­el­card on board from the cafe cars. This will mean you can trans­fer di­rectly to the tube when ar­riv­ing in Lon­don.

ROHAN TONER

AIR­PORT LOUNGES

Long lay­overs can put a damp­ener on your trav­els; check out the non-air­line aligned lounges at Bangkok’s Su­varn­ab­humi Air­port. They are sur­pris­ingly cheap – just $40 per 2 hours – and are spa­cious, clean and com­fort­able. With an open bar, snacks, Wi-Fi, and great show­er­ing fa­cil­i­ties, these lounges are well worth a visit. JEROME OTTON

SIN­GA­PORE TRAN­SIT

If you have a few hours to spare in be­tween flights at Sin­ga­pore air­port, pack your swim­mers and head for the rooftop pool in Ter­mi­nal 1. For just $US12 (about $A15) you can cool down, re­lax on lounges and have a shower with tow­els pro­vided. The pool also has a bar and food or­ders. You will then

be fresh and ready for your next flight. Per­fect way to wear out chil­dren be­fore the next leg of your flights.

LYNETTE DUFFY

PACK RIGHT

On a re­cent trip I used pack­ing cells for the first time. My bag has never been so neat and or­gan­ised. Group to­gether items: sea­sonal, dirty, un­der­wear. Packs can be placed straight into the ho­tel wardrobe for easy ac­cess and then popped back into the bag eas­ily. Also great for com­press­ing items and max­imis­ing space.

ROS MCCARTHY

HYDRATE

When trav­el­ling to hot, de­vel­op­ing coun­tries it is im­per­a­tive you drink bot­tled wa­ter. This gets bor­ing af­ter a while, so I al­ways travel with my favourite tea bags – lemon and gin­ger. I boil bot­tled wa­ter with the ho­tel room elec­tric jug and im­merse the tea bags, then re­turn the tea to bot­tles and freeze overnight in my bar fridge. Next day sip iced tea all day as it slowly de­frosts.

ALAN LLOYD

BOOK SWAP

Take just one book with you. When you fin­ish, take it to the lo­cal li­brary. They of­ten have a book ex­change, or old books for sale. Worked well in the US.

LAURA TEAL

PACK HACK

Pin­ter­est is great when you’re not sure what to pack. Whether you’re go­ing to Asia or to Europe in win­ter, you’ll find ideas of how to com­bine out­fits, use layers and, above all, pack light.

RIKA JOHNANDER

PIC­TURE: TRACY MOR­RIS, @THEBLONDENOMADS/IN­STA­GRAM

It's a very rare mo­ment as a mum of lit­tle ones to just be, sit still and have a mo­ment to your­self. Med­low Bath, NSW.

PIC­TURE: ISTOCK

He­li­copter tours are a pop­u­lar way to view stun­ning scenery and all the best spots you might want to ex­plore later on foot.

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