BEAT THE LAG

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - Escape - - YOUR VIEW -

To de­crease the ef­fects of jet lag, try to ad­just your bed­time for up to a week be­fore you de­part on your trip. That way, your body clock has al­ready be­gun to adapt to the time at your ar­rival des­ti­na­tion. Try it as it re­ally does work.

DEE HYDE

PLAY IT SAFE

Be­fore leav­ing for an overseas hol­i­day go to smar­trav­eller.gov.au to in­form the Aus­tralian Gov­ern­ment of the dates of your ab­sence from Aus­tralia and where you will be. This is in case there is any tur­moil in an­other coun­try so you will al­ways be looked af­ter. ACHILLES MAVROS

CHINA TRAP

Hav­ing de­cided on a trip to Shang­hai and Chengdu with a few days in Hong Kong, we then had to pro­vide five pages of per­sonal in­for­ma­tion, pho­tos of a cer­tain size and in­for­ma­tion of where we had trav­elled in the past two years which all had to be signed by a JP. This was then sent off with new and old pass­ports at a cost of $530 for two visas. If we had known this be­fore we booked, we would have gone else­where. We are still wait­ing to hear if we get the visas. It pays to do your home­work and ask ques­tions be­fore you pay up.

DOROTHY PAYNE

CHARGE IT UP

Al­ways carry a portable USB charger bat­tery pack with you. When you are trav­el­ling it is es­sen­tial to be able to recharge your phone, cam­era, iPad and lap­top. There is noth­ing worse than miss­ing out on pho­tos be­cause your bat­tery’s flat. It is also dif­fi­cult to recharge when you are out and about all day.

EMMA ROLLS

WASH­ING HACK

Bring suc­tion hooks from home and stick on the glass shower screen, in­side and out. Use a hanger for the big­ger items, and leave to dry. If a speed­ier dry is re­quired, stick the suc­tion cups to your ho­tel win­dow where the sun is shin­ing through and the dry­ing time will be su­per quick.

GOR­DON WRIGHT

SLEEP WELL

If you have a bad back and the bed in your ac­com­mo­da­tion is hard (like it was in China), re­quest an­other cou­ple of doonas. Fold them length­ways and you will end up hav­ing four to six ex­tra lay­ers of pil­low top to sleep on. This will help soften the wooden slats on the bed base and you won’t find your­self as stiff in the morn­ing.

KATIE DENNY

FLIGHT GURU

Hav­ing spent a large part of my work­ing ca­reer fly­ing all over the world, I’d like to of­fer a few words of ad­vice for new long-haul flyers. For long flights, make sure you select your seats – de­ter­mine the make and model of the air­craft for your flight and log onto seat­guru.com to find a seat map for your air­craft. The best ride is in the cen­tre of the air­craft over the wings. The worst ride is at the rear of the air­craft, where the tail moves around more, par­tic­u­larly in tur­bu­lence.

On larger air­craft, sit­ting to­wards the front means you will get to the cus­toms and im­mi­gra­tion queue at your des­ti­na­tion be­fore the few hun­dred other pas­sen­gers on your flight.

BOB WIL­LIAMS

PIC OF THE WEEK Se­ri­ously ... is this even real life?! From Aus­tralia to the Loire Val­ley in the French coun­try­side ... my home for the next month.

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