Lis­ten to best post- Bea­tles solo songs on your head­phones

The Sunday Telegraph (Sydney) - - NEWS - KATHY McCABE DAILYTELEGRAPH.COM.AU/HEAD­PHONES

FANS mourned the loss of The Bea­tles when the band that changed the mu­sic world of­fi­cially split in 1970.

Yet the songs each band mem­ber would write and record in the first decade af­ter the split are ar­guably as wor­thy ad­di­tions to the pop song­book.

This week’s Sun­day playlist, in­spired by the re­lease of Ringo Starr’s 19th solo record Give More Love, high­lights some of the best in­di­vid­ual songs recorded by John, Paul, Ge­orge and Ringo. 1. Pho­to­graph, Ringo Starr. Co-writ­ten with Ge­orge Har­ri­son, this beau­ti­ful song gained more poignancy in the wake of his band mate’s death. 2. My Sweet Lord, Ge­orge Har­ri­son. The first solo of­fer­ing from a Bea­tle to be No.1. 3. Mind Games, John Len­non. The ti­tle track of Len­non’s fourth record be­gan life as a protest an­them Make Love Not War. 4. Band On The Run, Paul McCart­ney. In­spired by both the on­go­ing is­sues be­tween the band­mates and drug busts. 5. In­stant Karma, John Len­non. Re­leased just 10 days af­ter Len­non wrote it. 6. It Don’t Come Easy, Ringo Starr. One of his ear­li­est solo re­leases. 7. What Is Life, Ge­orge Har­ri­son. This gem of a song has main­tained its pres­ence in pop cul­ture over the decades. 8. Live and Let Die, Paul McCart­ney. The theme song for the 1973 James Bond film was co-writ­ten by wife Linda and nom­i­nated for a Best Song Os­car. 9. Maybe I’m Amazed, Paul McCart­ney. Writ­ten as the band was break­ing up and ded­i­cated to Linda for hav­ing his back dur­ing those tough times. 10. Imag­ine, John Len­non. This best­selling sin­gle re­mains a pop an­them.

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