ROOTS

The Weekend Australian - Review - - Music - Polly Coufos

MOST of the 12 songs on Sara Tind­ley’s sec­ond album Lucky the Sun are set in a des­per­ate place, where love and lust are com­ing to those who think they may have al­ready seen their last good chance of such things go south. Tind­ley dis­plays a Lucinda Wil­liams- like in­ten­sity and ma­tu­rity in her writ­ing, and the de­li­cious folk, soul, blues and coun­try stylings sup­port her ar­gu­ment that a late- bloom­ing girl has a place in the world. There are sketchy de­tails in the lyrics but enough space in the var­ied ar­range­ments and Tind­ley’s dreamy de­liv­ery for the lis­tener to fill in the blanks. Hot For You siz­zles un­der the heat of James Gil­lard’s soul­ful gui­tar licks, One and Only amuses in show­ing a re­la­tion­ship where love is mea­sured by the of­fer to lis­ten to your ver­sion of Khe Sanh , while Paulie’s Last Ride tells of a friend who has come to an un­timely end; his farewell is both ten­der and un­sen­ti­men­tal. Pro­duced by Bill Cham­bers, this is hon­estto- good­ness mu­sic for grown- ups. Lucky the Sun Sara Tind­ley Vi­ta­min

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