ROCK OF AGES

WHILE GOOD MUSIC NEVER GETS OLD, I’M START­ING TO THINK MY MOSH-PIT DAYS MAY WELL BE BE­HIND ME

The Weekend Post - Cairns Eye - - Front Page - WORDS// RACHAEL JANSEN

There’s a mo­ment when you re­alise you’re not as young as you used to be. For me, it hap­pened last week­end. It started off fun enough: A kid-free week­end and night out with the hubby with din­ner, cock­tails and tickets to a show – Pseudo Echo and 1927.

Now the Pseuds were one of the band­crushes of my early and mid-teens and their music gov­erns many of my mem­o­ries and holds a sig­nif­i­cant place in my heart.

En­joy­ing pre-show drinks af­ter ar­riv­ing early, I watched the rest of the crowd trickle through the doors.

Within 20 min­utes I was sur­rounded by a bunch of mid­dle-aged peo­ple. Grey hair, ex­panded waist­lines and wrin­kles. I was in the mid­dle of them. What the?

When did ev­ery­body get so old? Given the Pseuds’ ver­sion of

cel­e­brates its 30th an­niver­sary this De­cem­ber, ob­vi­ously that’s when... the past three decades. Even the concert set-up catered to an older crowd, with full seat­ing right to the stage. No crowd surf­ing to be had. Not quite the pub or sta­dium shows of old.

Still, the Pseuds were as good as ever and had the crowd on their (prob­a­bly aching) feet. Spe­cial ku­dos to the bloke in front of me who did a mighty fine ro­bot in the aisles.

It made me won­der what the orig­i­nal Me­tal­lica fans are like now. Af­ter 30 years or so of heavy metal, they’re prob­a­bly half deaf... at least they can blame it on the music and not old age.

I bought tickets to Bruce Spring­steen on the week­end too, for the Aus­tralian leg of his tour next year. Pretty ex­cited about that.

is an­other nos­tal­gic sym­bol of my teen years. How­ever, it’s oc­curred to me The Boss is now 67, a year older than my father. And while I know I’m go­ing to en­joy his show, he won’t be that tight-jean-wear­ing ver­sion of Bruce from 30 years ago.

But I guess it’s a two-way street. The au­di­ences aren’t what they used to be ei­ther.

Pseudo Echo’s Brian Can­ham is no longer singing to a bunch of teens and 20-some­things. It’s now 40 to 60year-olds. No­body wants nanna knick­ers thrown on stage. Do groupies still hang around hop­ing to get lucky in mid­dle age?

Thank God for wine and the ac­tual music. It’s a com­bi­na­tion that keeps you at least feel­ing young, even if ap­pear­ances tell you other­wise.

To­day is my 45th birth­day and I’m not quite sure how that hap­pened. Put

or on and I’m still 15, 18, 20, 25.

Which is why I’ll con­tinue to go and watch these blasts from the past, be­cause –de­spite the fact they don’t look like they used to – they do at least sound like they used to, and we can all pre­tend noth­ing has changed.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.