RE­CLAIM­ING YOUR GAR­DEN

DON’T LET MOZZIES CON­TINUE TO GET THE BITE ON YOU IN YOUR GAR­DEN. HERE ARE SOME THINGS YOU CAN DO

The Weekend Post - Cairns Eye - - Front Page -

The yard spray for mos­qui­toes is a bit fash­ion­able at the mo­ment. It is a con­coc­tion of a num­ber of liq­uids of odd con­nec­tion but seems to be quite ef­fec­tive and last for long pe­ri­ods of time. Mix­ing a bot­tle of mouth­wash with three cups of Ep­som salts and three stub­bies of beer seems to be all it takes to rid your­self of these pests for at least 60-70 days at a time.

I mean, who works this stuff out? But it seems to be ef­fec­tive.

The Ep­som salts should be dis­solved within the liq­uids un­til they dis­ap­pear and then the con­coc­tion is ready for spray­ing around a deck, pool or out­door liv­ing area.

The claim is that the mix­ture won’t hurt plants, flow­ers or, pre­sum­ably, an­i­mals. How­ever, if you are will­ing to have a go, it would be ad­vis­able to spray early in the morn­ing when there is lit­tle breeze and avoid fish and frog ponds.

Other home reme­dies for mos­qui­toes, es­pe­cially af­ter the rain of this week when mos­qui­toes are breed­ing, are those man­age­ment is­sues of re­mov­ing items that col­lect wa­ter.

Avoid dark clothes that seem to at­tract the Dengue mos­quito es­pe­cially and also re­mem­ber that these mos­qui­toes are found close to and in homes in dark places.

Cow dung pats, if you can find them, are cer­tainly use­ful if only for their smoky nov­elty and earthy or­ganic pong.

Cit­ronella grass is worth an ex­per­i­ment and would prob­a­bly do best on slightly mounded beds as mass plant­ings to get the value of their pro­tec­tion. It is the oil in the grass that works and the more it sways and is touched the more ef­fec­tive it be­comes.

There are other nat­u­ral plant reme­dies for mos­qui­toes that are prob­a­bly out of our reach at the time of year when we most need some re­lief; these in­clude cat­mint and gera­ni­ums (a rea­son­able pos­si­bil­ity here). But you need heaps of them. One plant sim­ply won’t do the job.

The elec­tronic at­trac­tant lights are more ef­fec­tive with moths and large fly­ing in­sects as you hear them in­cin­er­ated with a crack and zap. Mos­quito man­age­ment with these at­trac­tant lights seems neg­li­gi­ble, but I’m al­ways open to stand­ing corrected.

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