MUSICAL GAR­DENS

MU­SIC AND GAR­DENS GO HAND IN HAND, WITH SONGS THROUGH THE AGES CAP­TUR­ING A LOVE OF GAR­DENS AND GROW­ING THINGS

The Weekend Post - Cairns Eye - - Front Page -

Gar­dens and mu­sic have al­ways seemed to be old mates. When you con­sider how many swoon­ing, sad and of­ten cheer­ful sym­phonies, dirges and rock songs that fea­ture some­thing about a gar­den, is not sur­pris­ing.

A good mix of cap­tur­ing nat­u­ral beauty and scor­ing a song and mood to match were made for each other.

Roses are the most cul­ti­vated plant, so it’s not un­usual they are the most of­ten re­ferred to flower in songs that fea­ture gar­dens, such as Lyn An­der­sen’s

Bro­ken hearts and swoon­ing lovers find mu­sic to tell of their pain and bliss. Bon Jovi does great jus­tice to some wrench­ing lyrics in the six or so min­utes hit.

would have to be one of the most recog­nis­able pieces of clas­si­cal mu­sic. Close your eyes and you can see Tchaikovsky’s am­bi­tion of his com­po­si­tion to find its way to your senses in the

Alek­sander Glazunov tried his hand at danc­ing plant mu­sic with the lit­tle known

and the flower power peo­ple and the hippy move­ment fea­tured a falsetto trip­ping and tip­toe­ing over tulips by Tiny Tim.

Later the clev­er­ness of lyrics ob­scured by trip­ping (other than tourism) and drug in­fu­sions gave us boppy songs that also fea­ture flow­ers.

Scot McKen­zie’s an­them of the time, ‘If you come wear flow­ers in your hair’, gave San Francisco a whole new per­sona. Not sure if it pro­moted any forms of gar­den­ing though, but gee they had a good time.

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