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Townsville Bulletin - - Lettersextra -

the ti­tle track of Rob­bie Wil­liams’latest of­fer­ing, Rude­box, was re­leased I was left won­der­ing whether my fas­ci­na­tion with the English pop star was com­ing to an end.

His pre­vi­ous album, In­ten­sive Care, had a few catchy num­bers but failed to re­pro­duce the cocky strut I have come to love, while the sin­gle Rude­box ap­peared to be an­other (fail­ing) ef­fort to break into the ever-elu­sive US mar­ket­place.

How­ever, I am pleased to say that af­ter lis­ten­ing to the new album on at least eight oc­ca­sions my faith has been re­stored.

While Rude­box is ob­vi­ously in­spired by the 1980s, in par­tic­u­lar Ge­orge Michael and the Pet Shop Boys, for the most part, this album hits the right but­tons.

I am not sure any of the songs will go on to be the smash hits but some of the lyrics are worth lis­ten­ing closely to.

Rob­bie’s tale of his pre-solo ca­reer in two songs The 80s and The 90s are bril­liant while his bonus track (about 90 sec­onds af­ter the end of the fi­nal song) is also good fun. HE is the rich­est man in rap in­dus­try and his latest album, Press Play, is a wel­come change for the mu­sic world.

It is unique and fu­tur­is­tic, mixed with a late night ur­ban feel. The third track, I Am, is an ex­tra­or­di­nary in­ter­lude and cre­ates a sense of high ex­pec­ta­tion and sets a cred­i­ble plat­form for the rest of the album.

The mu­sic mogul’s album is some­thing the young, flashy white-col­lared busi­ness­man could as­pire to, which to the un­der­ground’s dis­gust is where com­mer­cial rap is now headed.

Move over Jay Z, P. Diddy has fi­nally taken his place as the ur­ban king of New York.

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