CY­CLING GLASSES

Cut the glare and pro­tect your eyes while you’re on the road with our pick of the six best pairs

Triathlon Plus - - Contents -

Pro­tect your eyes from the el­e­ments with six of the best cy­cling glasses.

POC DO BLADE RACE­DAY £200 2pure.co.uk Se­ri­ous pro-level equip­ment, th­ese are used by the Can­non­dale-Garmin pro team. Their opin­ion-di­vid­ing style aside, the depth of the lens and to­tal eye cov­er­age af­forded by th­ese light­weight sun­nies is un­par­al­leled in this test. A mould­able nose bridge al­lows a per­fectly snug fit on the face, while the Carl Zeiss lenses are for­mu­lated to give high con­trast vi­sion so you can spot road im­per­fec­tions quicker. They also have an anti-fog treat­ment and rain drops sim­ply bead off the one-piece lens. But they’re very pricey.

OVER­ALL

OAK­LEY RADAR EV £145 oak­ley.com Par­tic­u­larly light­weight and well thought out, th­ese Oak­leys are also at the more ac­cept­able end of the brand’s price range. They’re not worn by count­less pro­fes­sional cy­clists for noth­ing. An ex­cep­tional field of vi­sion is com­bined with a clear op­ti­cal ex­pe­ri­ence to cre­ate a prod­uct worth sav­ing your pen­nies for. We’ve worn th­ese in all con­di­tions and they are re­sis­tant to fog­ging, rain and the glare of the bright Span­ish sun, where we tested.

OVER­ALL

LAZER SOLID STATE 1 £69.99 laz­er­sport.co.uk/eye­wear This mid-price of­fer­ing from the Bel­gian firm is ideal for rid­ers with smaller faces. Vent­ing in the top of the lens keeps mist­ing at bay ex­cept when pant­ing at a stand­still at traf­fic lights. They sit quite high up on the face, mean­ing vi­sion isn’t im­paired when rid­ing on the drops, al­though some draught made it in below the lens. Sadly, they’re let down by a flimsy nose bridge, akin to a heavy-duty pa­per­clip hold­ing the ad­justable rubber nose­piece in place.

OVER­ALL

SUN­WISE EQUINOX £37.99 sun­wise.co.uk Th­ese Bri­tish-made and af­ford­able sun­nies have a sim­i­larly close fit to the dhb pair we also tested. They are rel­a­tively light­weight and pro­vide am­ple pro­tec­tion from wind and grit. They come with four lenses, graded from 0 to 3 de­pend­ing on the strength of light con­di­tions you’re rid­ing in. The in­di­vid­ual lenses are clipped in sim­ply enough, al­though you’ll need to be care­ful not to smudge them with fin­ger­prints as it takes a lit­tle force to get them seated se­curely. A sound choice for the money.

OVER­ALL

MADI­SON RE­CON £79.99 madi­son.co.uk Heav­ily vented lenses make th­ese some of the best we’ve tested for re­sist­ing fog­ging. The rub­berised nose grip­per is not ad­justable al­though it is par­tic­u­larly ef­fec­tive in stop­ping the glasses from slid­ing down your face. The ad­di­tion of clear and or­ange tinted lenses to the pack­age means you’ll never be with­out the right lens for your ride, but the process of swap­ping be­tween them is more long-winded than any of the other multi-lens sun­nies here.

OVER­ALL

DHB PRO TRIPLE LENS £29.99 wig­gle.co.uk The most af­ford­able pair of sun­glasses on test, and punch­ing well above their weight. Al­though the lenses sit closer to the eyes than some (you might need to trim your eye­lashes), they of­fer a wide field of pe­riph­eral vi­sion, plus you’re get­ting three lenses (clear, smoked and or­ange) to suit most light con­di­tions. The lenses are eas­ily switched by pulling the one-piece shield from the frame, and sim­ply clip­ping the new lens in. They’re a great choice for rid­ers on a bud­get.

OVER­ALL

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