WORK­SHOP GUIDE: MIG WELD­ING

HOW TO CHOOSE A MIG SET, TUNE IT IN AND WELD PER­FECT SEAMS

Unique Cars - - GARAGE GURUS -

Ever won­dered how to do it? Here’s your an­swer.

WELD­ING IS

a near-es­sen­tial skill if you’re an old car en­thu­si­ast. Whether you’re un­der­tak­ing a full restora­tion or help­ing a daily driver through an MoT, the abil­ity to carry out your own welded re­pairs will po­ten­tially save you a mas­sive amount of money. It’s a skill that comes in handy in a wide range of other work­shop sit­u­a­tions, too.

We’re start­ing with MIG weld­ing, which is the most com­mon, ver­sa­tile and ac­ces­si­ble process for home restora­tion. Other pro­cesses are use­ful in cer­tain sit­u­a­tions, too. We’ll move on to those later. In this in­stal­ment, we’re cov­er­ing the ba­sics of set­ting up your MIG welder and run­ning a sim­ple weld on mild steel. We’ll look at dif­fer­ent joint types and ad­vanced tech­niques in forth­com­ing is­sues.

CHOOS­ING A WELDER

Be kind to your­self and buy a de­cent MIG weld­ing set. Avoid cheap sets that have con­stantly live torches or that don’t have cool­ing fans. Make sure its min­i­mum cur­rent is 30 amps or less. Stay away from bud­get ‘gas­less’ sets – the ugly re­sults will risk putting you off weld­ing for­ever. Gas is con­ve­niently avail­able in var­i­ous forms. Gen­er­ally speak­ing, the larger the cylin­der, the more cost-ef­fec­tive it is.

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