Bum lead

Unique Cars - - MORLEY’S WORKSHOP - Eric Waples, Al­bion Park, NSW.

Re­cently, you did a short piece on ig­ni­tion leads and spark plugs: Work­shop ba­sics, I think it was. And now Dave, (with his foray into chang­ing leads on the fuel-in­jected five-litre Holden en­gine) has ‘plugged us in’ to life be­fore we had in­di­vid­ual coil packs. Dave’s ig­ni­tion lead job on his Holden V8 is right up there with the three hours it used to take to change a Mini 850 fan belt on the side of the road.

But on the sub­ject of high­t­en­sion and ig­ni­tion leads, there was a time when we me­chan­i­cal peo­ple (who knew lit­tle about volts and re­sis­tance and stuff ) would throw our car­bon-core leads away af­ter a spark-plug change and fit cop­per core wire ones. The rea­son be­ing that in­vari­ably the core of the car­bon lead had been frac­tured when we re­moved the leads and the en­gine ran worse with the new plugs in than it did with the old ones.

“MY MATE BONDINI USED TO RECKON DRUM BRAKES ARE AS GOOD AS DISCS, BUT HE WAS TECH­NI­CALLY MAD”

Our elec­trica l logic was such t hat one didn’t care if t he re­sis­tance was not cor­rect at each plug, at least wit h t he cop­per wire, t he bug­ger f ired on a ll eight and ran like a dream. Of course, on job com­ple­tion, if said ve­hi­cle hap­pened to have a ra­dio f it­ted, you had your­self a bit of a stat ic is­sue en­su­ing from t he gen­er­a­tor.

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