HY­BRID / FLAT- BAR BIKES

The only ma­jor draw­back with a flat-bar bike is that you’re not as aero­dy­namic as you are on a road bike

Urban Cyclist - - Best Bikes For Commuting -

Hy­brid bikes com­bine the speed of nar­rower 700C wheels with the up­right rid­ing po­si­tion of a moun­tain bike. The de­tails vary a lot. You’ll find road bike-style caliper brakes and moun­tain bike-style disc brakes in this cat­e­gory, plus bikes dressed with racks and guards, and stripped-down ma­chines that are es­sen­tially rac­ers but for the bar. If you’re look­ing to ride fast on good roads but pre­fer a more up­right po­si­tion or just don’t get on with drop han­dle­bars, this could be the best op­tion. The only ma­jor draw­back with a flat-bar bike is that you’re not as aero­dy­namic as you are on a road bike or fixie equipped with drop han­dle­bars and, there­fore, not as quick. But is that re­ally a con­cern when your end point is the of­fice!? Bikes de­rived from ‘29er’ moun­tain bikes have re­cently en­tered the flat-bar fray. With fat 700C tyres they’ll roll over most ob­sta­cles and pro­vide de­cent grip on river paths and well-sur­faced trails. Fit mud­guards if you plan to ride year round. If you’re lucky you might find one with a belt drive fit­ted: these last ab­so­lutely ages – a Gates ver­sion is good for 15,000km or more – and are en­tirely main­te­nance and muck free. They’re more ex­pen­sive than a stan­dard chain­driven sys­tem but very re­li­able.

For Fairly quick Ver­sa­tile Against Can be al­most as frag­ile as road bikes

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