SPRING INTO SUM­MER

The heat is on: it’s time to shed your cold-weather com­forts and gear up for the warmer months with an over­haul of your skin­care, hair-care and make-up reg­i­mens.

VOGUE Australia - - Contents - WORDS LILITH HARDIE LUPICA PHO­TO­GRAPHS JAN WELTERS

Gear up for the warmer months with an over­haul of your skin­care, hair-care and make-up reg­i­mens.

“COM­ING OUT OF WIN­TER, SKIN IS OF­TEN DE­HY­DRATED AND SUN-DAM­AGED, AS WE TEND TO BE LAZY WITH SUN PRO­TEC­TION”

Fall­ing into bad habits dur­ing the win­ter months is so easy it al­most seems as if wak­ing up late, skip­ping yoga and fall­ing be­hind on your skin­care reg­i­men was al­ways your rou­tine. And while longer, warmer days are wel­come when spring ar­rives, it also means a harsh light is thrown on your lax be­hav­iour. Adopt­ing a health­ier at­ti­tude to mind and body means now is the time to clean up your act and pre­pare for the warmer months ahead.

Rather than a dras­tic over­haul that’s bound to be aban­doned when it all seems too hard, set­ting your­self sim­ple goals will not only seem achiev­able when your 6am wake-up call sounds, but also re­al­is­tic. The small­est of changes to a rou­tine can do won­ders for your frame of mind, so think of th­ese tips as start­ing points for a trans­for­ma­tion that should stay with you long after sum­mer is over.

Fit it in

For per­sonal trainer and yogi Shona Vertue, who counts David Beck­ham as a client, tak­ing steps to­wards a bet­ter body means avoid­ing re­ac­tive work­outs and fo­cus­ing on track­ing your re­sults so you can see that what you have com­mit­ted to is work­ing. “What ex­er­cise prac­tice would you rec­om­mend for some­one look­ing to re­set their fit­ness goals?” “Yoga is a prac­tice than en­cour­ages mind­ful­ness. It asks that you pay more at­ten­tion to phys­i­cal sen­sa­tions and thoughts that may be hold­ing you back from achiev­ing health. And it’s re­ally about in­creas­ing aware­ness – when we have a bet­ter aware­ness of our body, we take bet­ter care of it – rather than hav­ing to take re­ac­tive, re­ha­bil­i­ta­tive mea­sures, by pay­ing at­ten­tion to early signs of sick­ness and in­jury be­fore it oc­curs. I would rec­om­mend more than just yoga, and al­ways sug­gest com­bin­ing it with re­sis­tance and car­dio­vas­cu­lar train­ing, to ‘re­set’ and achieve both a strong, flex­i­ble and ag­ile body.” “Once you’ve de­cided on your fit­ness goals, how do you sug­gest stick­ing to them?” “Keep­ing track of re­sults, not just how your body looks, but also how it’s chang­ing in strength, fit­ness and flex­i­bil­ity, is a great way to stay mo­ti­vated, as it shows you ev­i­dence that there is a point to all your hard work.” “What easy life­style changes do you rec­om­mend to clients look­ing to change their rou­tines for the bet­ter?” “Drink more wa­ter, eat more veg­eta­bles (of dif­fer­ent colours), move vig­or­ously every day (par­tic­u­larly if your job is quite seden­tary), make sure you con­sume enough pro­tein to match your in­creased ac­tiv­ity and re­duce your al­co­hol in­take.”

Mind over mat­ter

New goals, new you? No idea where to start? The first step in your re­ha­bil­i­ta­tion is to cre­ate re­al­is­tic goals and stick to them. First and fore­most, it’s im­por­tant to iden­tify what you want to achieve, says life coach Cyn­thia Talone on suc­cess­ful goal set­ting.

“This can be hard for many of us, as we can be re­ally great at know­ing what we don’t want. Eval­u­at­ing and re­flect­ing where we would like to be in five years, three years, one year, 6 months and 3 months from now is a great way to start the plan­ning process.”

Talone adds it’s best to think of your goals as step­ping stones at first, and stresses the im­por­tance of re­main­ing flex­i­ble. Adapt­ing to change and your sur­round­ings is the key to reach­ing your goals in the short and long terms.

“If we are not more spe­cific, re­al­is­tic and flex­i­ble when we cre­ate our goals, it can pre­vent us from achiev­ing them,” Talone says. “Aim­ing high is great, how­ever, we some­times get tripped up in the day-to-day grind and for­get to fo­cus our at­ten­tion on the small steps that are needed to help us achieve our goals.”

Oth­er­wise, the big­gest hur­dle Talone en­coun­ters with her clients in the goal-set­ting jour­ney stems from feel­ing un­wor­thy and not be­ing ag­ile in the long-term. She says this is an easy trap to fall into, but it’s im­por­tant to reg­u­larly take stock of how far you’ve come, even if you haven’t reached the fi­nal des­ti­na­tion.

Re­assess your make-up wardrobe

Mas­ter­ing your beauty rou­tine in the transea­sonal months, in prepa­ra­tion for that ris­ing mer­cury, should be as sim­ple one, two, three, says Lara Srokowski, na­tional make-up di­rec­tor for Lancôme. She sug­gests par­ing things back and re­cal­i­brat­ing your ap­proach.

STEP ONE: STREAM­LINE “For an ef­fort­less beauty rou­tine this spring, think less is more when it comes to the amount of prod­ucts used. Keep your skin­care to a min­i­mum and use con­cen­trated light­weight prod­ucts like serums in­stead of mois­turis­ers. This way you still get the re­sults and ben­e­fits, but with lay­er­ing fewer prod­ucts,” says Srokowski, who be­lieves strip­ping back your rou­tine will pay off in the long run. STEP TWO: FO­CUS Once you’ve whit­tled your reg­i­men down to the ba­sics, fig­ure out what gaps there are in your beauty arse­nal and in­ves­ti­gate your op­tions. Miss­ing a re­li­able SPF? Need a trav­el­friendly lip­stick? Now’s the time to cre­ate your wish list and do some re­search. STEP THREE: TRIAL AND ER­ROR Be­fore splurg­ing, take the time to play around with the up-com­ing trends of the sea­son and mas­ter the tech­niques nec­es­sary to con­quer th­ese looks – there’s no point in in­vest­ing if you feel un­com­fort­able. Ex­pect to see “bold bright lips, fresh ef­fort­less skin with a pop of colour on the cheeks”, says Srokowski of sum­mer’s big­gest trends – so now is the time to fi­nally get around to mas­ter­ing lip liner. →

Hair dos

Whether your aim is to keep colour-treated hair look­ing fresh or prep locks for those UV rays, th­ese tips will have you cov­ered. IN­VEST IN … “Tak­ing care of the con­di­tion and colour of your hair is very im­por­tant,” says Kerry Warn, a hair ex­pert for John Frieda. He rec­om­mends that “even if you don’t have coloured or chem­i­cally treated hair, adding a treat­ment or serum to your weekly rou­tine will help hy­drate, re­pair and re­store bal­ance, soft­ness and shine.” AVOID … “The most com­mon mis­takes are re­ally overuse of styling tools, which is ex­treme heat,” says Warn. “It’s im­por­tant to use a heat pro­tec­tant: choose a serum based on thick­ness and tex­ture of your hair.”

Per­fect your base

For skin, it is all a mat­ter of know­ing your in­gre­di­ents. Glyc­er­ine, ce­ramides and fatty acids such as linoleic acid and al­pha hy­droxy acids (AHAs) should form the ba­sis of your skin­care rou­tine, says Dr Michelle Hunt, of In­ner Syd­ney Der­ma­tol­ogy and a fel­low of the Aus­tralasian Col­lege of Der­ma­tol­o­gists. “Mois­turis­ers con­tain­ing AHAs will not only hy­drate the skin but help ex­fo­li­ate dead skin cells, which is great prepa­ra­tion for fake tans,” says Hunt, who also ad­vises that you avoid long hot show­ers and over­heat­ing to help re­pair dry win­ter skin.

The Clinic co-di­rec­tor Kaye Scott notes: “A skin­care reg­i­men needs to be sea­son­ally spe­cific to be ef­fec­tive.” She says the big­gest mis­take she sees clients make dur­ing win­ter is not con­tin­u­ing to use sun­screen as dili­gently as they would in sum­mer. “Com­ing out of win­ter, the skin is of­ten de­hy­drated and sun-dam­aged, as we tend to be lazy with sun pro­tec­tion, cleans­ing and hy­dra­tion. En­sur­ing the dead and de­hy­drated epi­der­mal layer has been re­moved and your skin hy­drated will make it much more re­cep­tive to prod­ucts pro­vid­ing pro­tec­tion go­ing into the sum­mer,” says Scott.

If you’re deal­ing with pig­men­ta­tion prob­lems after win­ter or have been neg­li­gent with sun care, Scott sug­gests try­ing Fraxel, a non­in­va­sive laser ther­apy that tar­gets the deep lay­ers of the skin and is ef­fec­tive in treat­ing pig­men­ta­tion, dis­coloura­tion, freck­les, sun spots, age spots, acne scar­ring and over­all skin re­ju­ve­na­tion.

“In com­bi­na­tion with Fraxel, ty­rosi­nase in­hibitors, skin bright­en­ing serums, retinol and hy­dra­tion are the most im­por­tant in­gre­di­ents for the skin com­ing out of win­ter,” says Scott.

FLOAT ON IF YOU FIND IT HARD TO SWITCH OFF, CON­SIDER A DIP INTO FLOAT THER­APY, SUG­GESTS SHAUN BUT­TON, FOUNDER OF KOA RE­COV­ERY, WHO SAYS THAT APART FROM GIV­ING YOU A CHANCE TO UN­PLUG FROM YOUR LIFE, “FLOAT THER­APY AND THE USE OF SEN­SORY DE­PRI­VA­TION IN WARM MAGNESIUM-DENSE WA­TER PRO­VIDES A RANGE OF BEN­E­FITS, IN­CLUD­ING A DE­CREASE IN STRESS AND COR­TI­SOL LEV­ELS, A BOOST TO THE IM­MUNE SYS­TEM AND A LOW­ER­ING OF BLOOD PRES­SURE”.

STILA STAY ALL DAY FOUN­DA­TION & CONCEALER IN LIGHT 3, $58.

LANCÔME MATTE SHAKER BY OLYMPIA LE TAN IN OLYMPIA, $36.

PHI­LOS­O­PHY BRIGHTEN MY DAY ALL-OVER SKIN-PER­FECT­ING BRIGHT­EN­ING ESSENCE, $80.

BEN­E­FIT COS­MET­ICS FOOL­PROOF BROW POW­DER IN 03, $42.

CLARINS 4-COLOUR ALL-IN-ONE PEN EYES & LIPS, $45.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.