Pick­ing the right pad­docks for mung­beans

Warwick Daily News - South West Queensland Rural Weekly - - Advertisement - by Cindy Ben­jamin

PULSE AUS­TRALIA NORTH­ERN de­vel­op­ment agronomist Paul McIntosh is urg­ing grow­ers to plant mung­beans to ‘break up the sea of sorghum’ that he ex­pects to be planted across north­ern NSW and south­ern Queens­land in the 2018-19 sum­mer. Strong de­mand for Aus­tralian mung­beans is ex­pected to keep prices buoy­ant and at­tract new and ex­pe­ri­enced grow­ers to plant the shiny green beans. Fol­low­ing an ex­cep­tion­ally dry win­ter, Mr McIntosh is urg­ing grow­ers and their agron­o­mists to pay par­tic­u­lar at­ten­tion to pad­dock se­lec­tion and to avoid plant­ing mung­beans in pad­docks were there have been re­cent ap­pli­ca­tions of resid­ual her­bi­cides. “Mung­beans are very sen­si­tive to resid­ual her­bi­cides, in­clud­ing the long-last­ing Group I prod­ucts such as Tor­don and Lon­trel, Group B sul­fony­lurea (SU) residues such as Glean, Lo­gran and Ally, and Group C tri­azine residues such as atrazine,” he said. “Her­bi­cide residues can pose a se­ri­ous risk to mung­bean crop safety, par­tic­u­larly af­ter dry or cold win­ter pad­dock even is mung­bean’s likely test­ing con­di­tions. to his­tory be for sen­si­tiv­ity.” worth­while, resid­ual is Know­ing crit­i­cal lev­els given and the con­sid­er­a­tions Other im­por­tant are to as­sess the mois­ture and nu­tri­ent sta­tus of the in­tended mung­bean pad­docks. Mr McIntosh said mung­beans re­quire a min­i­mum of 75 mm of wet soil to sup­port a well­grown crop. “Mung­beans are a very quick crop and it is not usu­ally a good idea to plant know­ing that suc­cess is de­pen­dent on in-crop rain. Sum­mer plant­ing is usu­ally the safest plant­ing win­dow for most grow­ers and gen­er­ally re­sults in the best qual­ity prod­uct for mar­ket,” he said. “The crop will also re­quire good sup­plies of phos­pho­rus, potas­sium, sul­fur and zinc.” “If you plan to use grow­er­re­tained seed, test for ger­mi­na­tion % and vigour be­fore plant­ing and make sure seed is re­placed ev­ery three years,” he said. “I’d rec­om­mend buy­ing AMAap­proved seed to be as­sured of strong ger­mi­na­tion and vigour, along with re­duced risk of seed-borne dis­ease. All in­oc­u­lated strain crop for op­tions is com­pelling While plant­ing its can broadleaf own of in there rhi­zo­bia, fix mung­beans, use.” with seed suf­fi­cient ev­i­dence are weed the needs to lim­ited cor­rect en­sure con­trol ni­tro­gen that there to in­crop be the nar­rower the can crop in­creased same achieve com­pe­ti­tion, row plant yield. a spac­ing high pop­u­la­tion along level us­ing with of rec­om­mends en­gage Mr McIntosh the ser­vices that strongly grow­ers of an agronomist up­dated their who mung­bean has re­cently agron­omy hun­dred agron­o­mists skills. “Over and one ad­vi­sors at­tended the AMA Mung­bean Train­ing Cour­ses in Toowoomba, Emer­ald and Ayr late last year and early this year,” he said. “Hav­ing such a depth of knowl­edge and ex­pe­ri­ence across the grow­ing re­gions means grow­ers can be con­fi­dent that good ad­vice is never far away.”

Fol­low­ing win­ter, Aus­tralia Paul is an urg­ing McIntosh, ex­cep­tion­ally grow­ers Pulse dry and their agron­o­mists to pay par­tic­u­lar at­ten­tion to pad­dock se­lec­tion and to avoid plant­ing mung­beans in pad­docks were there have been re­cent ap­pli­ca­tions of resid­ual her­bi­cides.

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