Al­lergy suf­fer­ers spring into ac­tion

Western Suburbs Weekly - - Health -

WILD flow­ers are not the only things that bloom in spring.

With Septem­ber herald­ing the start of the sneez­ing-sea­son, paramedics ex­pect asthma-re­lated emer­gen­cies to flour­ish.

St John Am­bu­lance event health ser­vices op­er­a­tions man­ager Melissa Rorke said this time of the year was no­to­ri­ous for trig­ger­ing symp­toms in al­lergy suf­fer­ers.

“As the trees start to bloom and pollen be­comes air­borne, al­lergy suf­fer­ers start to suf­fer from symp­toms such as a runny nose, itchy eyes, cough­ing and asthma,” Ms Rorke said.

“We would en­cour­age peo­ple to call 000 if they are hav­ing a se­vere re­ac­tion and to try to keep calm.”

Last spring, paramedics at­tended more than 110 asthma-re­lated in­ci­dents, com­pared to less than 90 a month dur­ing the rest of the year

Hor­ti­cul­tur­al­ist Sab­rina Hahn also of­fered some ad­vice to help re­duce al­lergy risks while out­doors.

“Avoid trees such as birches, planes, alder, ash, elm, liq­uid am­ber, po­plar, olives and male she-oaks,” Ms Hahn said.

“Shrubs such as privet and wat­tle are also no­to­ri­ous for up­set­ting asth­mat­ics and those who live in ru­ral ar­eas can also be af­fected by Pater­son’s curse and rye-grasses.”

Pic­ture: Mar­cus Whisson www.com­mu­ni­typix.com.au d425882

St John Am­bu­lance event health ser­vices op­er­a­tions man­ager Melissa Rorke at the Kings Park Wild Flower Fes­ti­val.

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