Ap­ple of our eye

Western Suburbs Weekly - - Front Page - By SOPHIE GABRIELLE

JOHN Cripps, who de­vel­oped the in­ter­na­tion­ally renowned Pink Lady ap­ple, was yes­ter­day ap­pointed an Of­fi­cer of the Or­der of Aus­tralia. The Floreat res­i­dent was recog­nised on Aus­tralia Day for his con­tri­bu­tions to the agri­cul­ture and food sec­tors. Mr Cripps was in­ducted into the Royal Agri­cul­tural So­ci­ety of WA Hall of Fame in 2010.

AFTER a lifetime of ap­ple tast­ing, the breeder of the popular Pink Lady ap­ple says he has had his fill.

Floreat res­i­dent John Cripps was ap­pointed an Of­fi­cer of the Or­der of Aus­tralia yes­ter­day for his ser­vice to pri­mary in­dus­try through his con­tri­bu­tions to the agri­cul­ture and food sec­tors.

Mr Cripps bred the Cripps Pink ap­ple, mar­keted as the in­ter­na­tion­ally renowned and trade­marked Pink Lady, at the Stoneville Re­search Sta­tion in 1973.

He said the an­nounce­ment on Aus­tralia Day yes­ter­day caught him off guard.

“I was sur­prised,” Mr Cripps said.

“I wish I had more en­cour­age­ment ear­lier on when I thought I had bred a com­mer­cial ap­ple.

“Some fruit grow­ers re­alised the ad­van­tages of the ap­ple. They can be stored for a long time.”

Mr Cripps said the par­ents of the Pink Lady, which ac­counts for more than 30 per cent of ap­ple pro- duc­tion in Aus­tralia, are the Lady Wil­liams and Golden De­li­cious. He also bred the sis­ter va­ri­ety Cripps Red ap­ple, mar­keted as the trade­marked Sun­downer.

“The Pink Lady was more suc­cess­ful than I thought it might be,” Mr Cripps said.

He has also played a part in set­ting up the Pem­ber­ton and Man­jimup vine­yard area with his work on vine root­stocks.

In 2010, he was in­ducted into the Royal Agri­cul­tural So­ci­ety of WA Hall of Fame.

DE­TAILS

Pic­ture: An­drew Ritchie www.com­mu­ni­typix.com.au d432187

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