A re­turn to his roots

Western Suburbs Weekly - - Weekly Life - Tanya MacNaughton

ALEX Wil­liams has spent a lot of his ca­reer af­ter grad­u­at­ing from WAAPA in 2011 im­i­tat­ing real peo­ple in Un­der­ground: The Ju­lian As­sange Story, INXS: Never Tear Us Apart and Catch­ing Mi­lat.

He is also in tele­vi­sion drama Brock, which screens on Channel 10 on Oc­to­ber 9 and 10 to hon­our the 10th an­niver­sary of Peter Brock’s death.

So it is un­der­stand­able the Perth-raised, Syd­ney-based ac­tor de­cided it was time to re­turn to the theatre.

“I hadn’t done any theatre in a while, which I’ve al­ways loved,” Wil­liams said. “I think it’s where you grow as an ac­tor and it was im­por­tant for me to go and do that.

“My agent and I ap­proached a bunch of theatre com­pa­nies, I did a round of au­di­tions, and was in Romeo and Juliet at the start of this year with Bell Shake­speare, which was the first pro­fes­sional theatre gig I’d done.

“Romeo was a role I’d al­ways wanted to play and from there the thirst con­tin­ued.”

Wil­liams has re­turned home to make his Black Swan State Theatre Com­pany de­but in Tartuffe – The Hyp­ocrite, a re­vival of Moliere’s clas­sic 17th cen­tury satire by Justin Flem­ing.

The pro­duc­tion is on at State Theatre Cen­tre of WA’s Heath Ledger Theatre, which was built while Wil­liams was study­ing at WAAPA.

“It’s such a beau­ti­ful space and Tartuffe is such a bril­liant play, es­pe­cially this adap­ta­tion, that I thought it was too good to turn down,” he said.

“It has been so much fun see­ing where we can go with it, es­pe­cially with it being set in mod­ern day Aus­tralia.

“I think it’s just a funny, ridicu­lous play and good night at the theatre.”

Wil­liams said Tartuffe – The Hyp­ocrite was about a man who got sucked in to hav­ing ev­ery­thing taken away from him.

“Tartuffe is a very poor man, or so he ap­pears to be, and my fa­ther Or­gon in a way falls in love with this man, in the sense that he sees him as being pi­ous and the height of hu­man de­vo­tion to God,” he said. “He’s sick of his fam­ily, who are very rich and af­flu­ent bad peo­ple, which they may or may not be, de­pend­ing on how you look at it.

“But be­hind closed doors, Tartuffe is try­ing to propo­si­tion his wife.”

The cast in­cludes Dar­ren Gil­shenan (The Moody’s) play­ing Tartuffe, Jenny Davis, Tessa Lind, Hugh Parker, James Sweeny, Steve Turner, Alison van Reeken and Emily Weir.

Wil­liams plays Or­gon’s son Damis, who smells a rat from the start.

“He’s not hav­ing a bar of it and it’s a fun char­ac­ter to play be­cause he’s ridicu­lous; they’re all ridicu­lous, it’s a farce.”

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