Pi­ran­has turn Tigers

Western Suburbs Weekly - - News - By BELINDA CIPRIANO

MONIQUE Este­ban (17), Lou Carey (29) and Eloise Wif­fen (17) will swap their Pi­ran­has logo with the Clare­mont Foot­ball Club’s tiger em­blem in 2017. The Pi­ran­has ini­tially aligned with the Clare­mont Foot­ball Club in 2006 but next year will say good­bye to their beloved pi­ranha logo and adopt the tiger em­blem as part of a new strate­gic di­rec­tion. Club pres­i­dent Eleanor Grin­ceri said although the club was proud of its histo ry, the move was an im­por­tant one for its next phase. “This will see us trans­form from a com­mu­nity club to a pro­fes­sion­ally run and man­aged body,” she said.

AS one chap­ter closes for the Clare­mont Women’s Foot­ball Club, an­other will open in 2017.

The club pre­vi­ously known as the In­naloo Pi­ra­hanas was one of four orig­i­nal in­au­gu­ral teams to form part of the WA Women’s Foot­ball League in 1986.

De­spite align­ing with the Clare­mont Foot­ball Club (CFC) in 2006, next year the women will say good­bye to their beloved pi­ra­hana logo and adopt the tiger em­blem as part of a new strate­gic di­rec­tion.

Club pres­i­dent Eleanor Grin­ceri said although the club was proud of its his­tory, the move was an im­por­tant one for its next phase.

“We are the only club to have re­tained its orig­i­nal logo of the pi­ranha and we are very proud of our his­tory,” she said.

“How­ever, with all great ven­tures change is in­evitable.

“As of 2017 we will be re­plac­ing our much loved pi­ranha and adopt­ing the em­blem of the tiger and the same jumper de­sign as the men.

“This will see us trans­form from a com­mu­nity club to a pro­fes­sion­ally run and man­aged body.”

With the in­tro­duc­tion of the Aus­tralian Foot­ball League Women’s de­but sea­son next year, Ms Grin­ceri said she be­lieved the in­tro­duc­tion of the league was a huge step for­ward for the AFL to recog­nise the women’s as­so­ci­a­tion with the game.

It has also spurred a mas­sive in­ter­est, with young girls want­ing to play the sport, some­thing the club takes pride in.

“Sud­denly women can be recog­nised for their ef­forts, with the po­ten­tial to be­come a pro­fes­sional AFL player,” she said.

“In the Clare­mont dis­trict there is a com­plete path­way for fe­male play­ers from ju­niors to se­niors.

“We coach Year 4 girls who have their eyes set on play­ing for the Dock­ers.

“As of last year, that wasn’t an op­tion for an as­pir­ing foot­baller.

“Our anec­do­tal ex­pe­ri­ence is repli­cated in na­tional fig­ures which rate AFL as the fastest grow­ing fe­male sport.”

The club cur­rently man­ages two se­nior teams and one Youth Girls, which have both had suc­cess.

The Youth Girls have taken part in the fi­nal se­ries for the past three years and won their first flag, while the last se­nior vic­tory was last year.

To con­tinue its suc­cess the club now wants spon­sors and sup­port­ers to help take it to the next level.

“With the es­tab­lish­ment of the na­tional com­pe­ti­tion, it is in­te­gral that we take the next steps in align­ing with Clare­mont Foot­ball Club,” Ms Grin­ceri said.

“For now the sym­bolic change to the Tigers and a re­newed mem­o­ran­dum of un­der­stand­ing with CFC will pro­vide a plat­form to be­gin a stepped transition.

“Es­sen­tially the women’s teams in the state are ex­pected to pro­duce na­tional league qual­ity play­ers on a com­mu­nity club bud­get/or­gan­i­sa­tional struc­ture.

“We will be­come one of the nine feeder clubs into the na­tional league, which is why it is es­sen­tial we be­come more pro­fes­sional and com­pet­i­tive.”

For more in­for­ma­tion, email com­mit­tee mem­ber Lou Carey at clare­mon­twfc@ gmail.com.

Pic­ture: An­drew Ritchie www.com­mu­ni­typix.com.au d463268

Pic­ture: An­drew Ritchie www.com­mu­ni­typix.com.au d463268

Monique Este­ban, Lou Carey and Eloise Wif­fen con­test the ball.

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