Fields of en­deav­our

Western Suburbs Weekly - - Front Page - By BELINDA CIPRIANO

NED­LANDS stu­dent Sharni-leigh Kit­tow is more com­fort­able on the foot­ball field than the cat­walk but is get­ting out of her com­fort zone for a good cause.

The Swan Dis­tricts women’s player will com­pete for a po­si­tion as a na­tional fi­nal­ist in the Miss West Coast WA State Fi­nals next month.

As part of the com­pe­ti­tion jour­ney, the 23-year-old is rais­ing money to help fund a NETS am­bu­lance for sick and dis­ad­van­taged chil­dren in WA.

“I think it is re­ally im­por­tant to be in­volved with such causes, as mak­ing a pos­i­tive im­pact on them can be life-chang­ing for those in­volved,” she said.

NED­LANDS pri­mary ed­u­ca­tion univer­sity stu­dent Sharni-leigh Kit­tow will swap foot­ball for fundrais­ing af­ter mak­ing it to the fi­nal 24 in the Miss West Coast 2017 com­pe­ti­tion.

The Swan Dis­tricts women’s player, who is stepping out of her com­fort zone to bring aware­ness to a good cause, said it was im­por­tant to make a pos­i­tive im­pact in the com­mu­nity.

“I haven’t ac­tu­ally done any­thing like this be­fore,” she said.

“I def­i­nitely want to in­form oth­ers of Toy­box In­ter­na­tional’s fundrais­ing project, which fo­cuses on rais­ing enough funds to buy WA a NETS am­bu­lance for sick and dis­ad­van­taged chil­dren in West­ern Aus­tralia.

“I think it is re­ally im­por­tant to be in­volved with such causes, as mak­ing a pos­i­tive im­pact on them can be life chang­ing for those in­volved.”

Tak­ing to the cat­walk as op­posed to the foot­ball field, the 23-year-old said the in­tro­duc­tion of the na­tional com­pe­ti­tion was some­thing she was ex­tremely ex­cited about.

“I would love to play na­tion­ally; it’s al­ways been a dream of mine to play sport at such an elite level, whether AFL or bas­ket­ball, an­other sport I’m pas­sion­ate about.

“I’m in the WA Tal­ent Academy and have re­cently been se­lected to rep­re­sent WA in the un­der-23 Women’s State AFL team, which is some­thing to look for­ward to.

“It’s so great to see so many girls’ dreams come true, and it shows how pow­er­ful equal­ity be­tween men and women through sport re­ally can be.”

Kit­tow, an Aboriginal woman born and bred in Al­bany, said she took pride in be­ing a girl from the coun­try and was ea­ger to fin­ish­ing her de­gree and work with chil­dren.

“I think the free­dom that a coun­try town por­trays re­ally rep­re­sents who I am as a per­son,” she said.

“I am very proud to be an Aboriginal Aus­tralian. My mother is Aboriginal and Aus­tralian and from the Ny­oon­gar tribe and my fa­ther is English.

“I am half way through my de­gree and I’m also a nanny part-time, which I love.

“I ab­so­lutely adore chil­dren and think it is im­por­tant to bet­ter un­der­stand and to build on our knowl­edge of our youth, af­ter all they are the can­vas to our fu­tures.

“Hav­ing an im­pact on how they learn and what they learn I think is a great thing.”

Kit­tow will com­pete for a po­si­tion as a na­tional fi­nal­ist in the Miss West Coast WA State Fi­nals next month.

If she makes the top six, she will go on to rep­re­sent WA as a na­tional fi­nal­ist at the Miss Uni­verse Aus­tralia Fi­nals in June.

To do­nate, visit https://mis­s­west­coast2017.ev­ery­day­hero.com/au/nets­fundrais­ing-project.

Www.com­mu­ni­typix.com.au d466748 Pic­ture: Andrew Ritchie

Sharni-leigh Kit­tow is a WA Women’s Foot­ball League player and Miss Uni­verse fi­nal­ist.

Pic­ture: Andrew Ritchie d466748

WA Women’s Foot­ball League player and Miss West Coast WA fi­nal­ist Sharni-leigh Kit­tow.

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