AMAZ­ING WHALE PICS

Whitsunday Times - - FRONT PAGE - Peter Car­ruthers Peter.Car­ruthers@news­re­gional­me­dia.com.au

THEY have suc­cess­fully clawed their way back form the brink of ex­tinc­tion since the ban­ning of com­mer­cial whal­ing of hump­back whales in 1963.

And the calm and warm wa­ters of the Whit­sun­day of­fer calv­ing fe­males the per­fect nurs­ery to raise their off spring be­fore head­ing back south to­ward the end of the year.

Hump­back whales travel in pods of two to 15 in­di­vid­u­als.

Of­ten these groups are tem­po­rary, mean­ing they stay to­gether for only a short amount of time and moth­ers usu­ally stay with their ba­bies for about one year.

The ma­jes­tic hump­backs get their name be­cause of the habit of rais­ing and bend­ing the back in prepa­ra­tion for a dive, ac­cen­tu­at­ing the hump in front of the dor­sal fin.

Last week the Whit­sun­day Times put the call out for whale pho­tos and the emails came flood­ing in with your amaz­ing im­ages.

Most whales will linger in the north be­fore head­ing to the Antarc­tic in Novem­ber.

Keep send­ing pho­tos and video to ed­i­tor@ whit­sun­day­times.com.au.

PHOTO: DEB­BIE DUG­GAN

THERE SHE GOES: A breach­ing hump­back cap­tured by Deb­bie Dug­gan.

PHOTO: ANNE S SMITH

Anne Smith cap­tured this young hump­back whale breach­ing at Fun­nel Bay on board Ocean Dy­nam­ics last week.

PHOTO: WHIT­SUN­DAY GET­AWAY

Whit­sun­day Get­away this week cap­tured this breach­ing hump­back.

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