MICHELLE’S WEIGHT-LOSS WIS­DOM

It’s spring: we’re out of hi­ber­na­tion (chunky knits, be­gone) and al­ready en­joy­ing lighter evenings, fewer lay­ers and the buzzy countdown to sum­mer. But, like the best nights out and a de­cent fake tan, hit­ting the beach can feel a whole lot bet­ter with som

Women's Health Australia - - FITNESS -

1 MY PHI­LOS­O­PHY AROUND HEALTH AND WEIGHT LOSS IS TO KEEP IT SIM­PLE

(be­cause fussy fad di­ets in­vari­ably fail). It’s so easy to go down the rab­bit hole with all the zil­lions of mi­cro-isms when re­ally, for most of us, it’s about fo­cus­ing on the macro-isms to be healthy and [within] a healthy weight range. Eat un­pro­cessed, nat­u­ral food in ap­pro­pri­ate por­tion sizes, ex­er­cise reg­u­larly and get good-qual­ity sleep. 2 NU­TRI­TION BY FAR PLAYS THE BIG­GEST ROLE IN WEIGHT LOSS. I al­ways say it’s about 80 per cent nu­tri­tion and 20 per cent ex­er­cise. Suit­able nu­tri­tion fu­els your body with­out stok­ing your fat stores and, if you’re [kilo­joule] re­strict­ing (a com­mon method for those who need to lose weight), you’ll still lose weight even if you don’t do any ex­er­cise be­cause your body is in [kilo­joule] deficit.

Want to add ex­er­cise into the mix? You’ll be strength­en­ing your soft tis­sues, build­ing your bones and get­ting the feel-good fac­tor men­tally – the whole pack­age! Peo­ple can of­ten over­look how much ex­er­cise pos­i­tively im­pacts your men­tal state.

3 IF A CLIENT AP­PROACHED ME ABOUT GET­TING IN SHAPE, THE FIRST THING I’D DO IS STRIP OUT ALL SOFT DRINKS.

Of­ten, peo­ple are con­sum­ing mas­sive amounts of su­gar and ex­cess [kilo­joules] through soft drinks, and just chang­ing that one thing can have a pro­found ef­fect. The sec­ond thing? I’d get them eat­ing break­fast, lunch and din­ner con­sis­tently ev­ery sin­gle day. Lots of times peo­ple skip meals and then binge when they fi­nally do eat, or they’ll eat pretty much con­tin­u­ously through­out the day. In­sti­gat­ing the habit of eat­ing three set meals daily pulls things back into line and then we can fine-tune their habits more eas­ily from there.

4 THE WORK­OUTS IN KEEPING IT OFF FO­CUS ON BOTH CAR­DIO AND STRENGTH.

Car­dio trains the heart and lungs, which power your body. Think of it as charg­ing your bat­tery: with a full bat­tery, you have the en­ergy to ham­mer out strength-train­ing ses­sions. My favourite work­outs com­bine strength and car­dio, so I might do a cir­cuit of a 400m run + 10 push-ups + 10 over­head squats, and re­peat that as many times as pos­si­ble.

5 YOU NEED TO GET TO YOUR EDGE TO EVOLVE.

Choose weights that cause you to fail on the last few reps – then you know you’ve hit your limit and train­ing adap­ta­tions will oc­cur.

With car­dio, you want to feel like you can’t get enough air in and can’t talk. This is a sign you’re at your limit and your body will adapt to im­prove its car­dio­vas­cu­lar ca­pac­ity.

6 AT SOME POINT EACH MORN­ING, YOU’RE GOING TO NEED TO GET UP TO GO FOR A WEE SO WHEN YOU DO, WORK OUT! LUNGE FROM YOUR BED TO THE LOO – THAT’S YOUR FIRST EX­ER­CISE.

While wash­ing your hands, squat – boom, that’s your sec­ond ex­er­cise. Skip to the kitchen for your third. Push-ups against the bench­top – there’s a fourth. If you’re done after that, all good. You worked out, and now have a big glass of water, break­fast and get into your day. If you’re feel­ing charged up and ready to go longer, grab my book and hit one of the work­outs in there.

7 WHEN IT COMES TO RE­SULTS, BOTH CAR­DIO AND STRENGTH WORK

are going to burn fat, give you en­ergy and bol­ster your men­tal state. Weight loss will be dif­fer­ent from per­son to per­son and week to week, but gen­er­ally if you weigh less than 100kg you could ex­pect to lose be­tween 0.5 and 1.5kg per week if you’re eat­ing for [kilo­joule] deficit.

8 YOUR PLATE IS THE KEY TO TON­ING UP.

If you don’t eat well, it doesn’t mat­ter how toned your mus­cles are – be­cause no one will see them un­der the ex­cess fat stores. At the same time, make sure to do strength­train­ing ex­er­cises that are higher reps and lower weight, so you’re ton­ing your ex­ist­ing mus­cle mass rather than sim­ply in­creas­ing it too markedly.

9 KEEP A FOOD DI­ARY FOR A WEEK

if you hit a weight­loss plateau. It’ll help you to see if there’s any­where ex­tra calo­ries might have crept in. Of­ten we get por­tion dis­tor­tion; if we haven’t been con­scious with our food, we can start to con­sume more than we actually need. You could eas­ily have been drink­ing to ex­cess – say if you’ve had more than a cou­ple of boozy nights or a bunch of high-fruit smooth­ies. It doesn’t take long to go over what you need if your goal is weight loss. My book has a spe­cific meal plan called ‘Stop Stalling’ with re­set recipes to help you if you’ve hit a wall. Think about whether you’ve been push­ing your­self too hard – over­train­ing is just as detri­men­tal as un­der­train­ing, so keep an ex­er­cise di­ary as well. Fi­nally, has any­thing changed in terms of stress in your life and how much qual­ity sleep you’re get­ting? Stress slows down your meta­bolic rate, so your body burns fuel less ef­fi­ciently, while sucky sleep is a stress [it­self].

10 NEVER GO TO A SO­CIAL EVENT HUN­GRY.

Fill up be­fore­hand so you’re less likely to be tempted by food there, which is of­ten high in bad fats and low in good nu­tri­tion. Number two, stand with your back to the buf­fet – out of sight, out of mind. Or if peo­ple are cir­cling with canapes, have a drink in one hand and a plate in the other. No hands free au­to­mat­i­cally means no ex­cess [kilo­joules] con­sumed. Thirdly, have a cham­pagne flute filled with sparkling water. Zero al­co­hol so zero [kilo­joules]. Plus, peo­ple will think it’s cham­pagne so won’t try to peer pres­sure you into drink­ing. Last but not least, re­mem­ber you don’t have to go to ev­ery sin­gle event – ex­er­cise your right to say ‘no’. I’ve found hav­ing a child is one of the best ex­cuses in the world.

It’s worth hav­ing a child just for the get-out-of-jail/party-free card!

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