DAM­AGE LIM­I­TA­TION

More than onethird of strength­train­ing in­juries strike the shoul­der, say US re­searchers. If you have an ex­ist­ing nig­gle – or a shoul­der that clicks or pops – try these work­arounds.

Women's Health Australia - - BEST BODY -

1 IF YOUR SHOUL­DERS ARE UP BY YOUR EARS DUR­ING PLANKS TRY CORKSCREWING YOUR HANDS

Be­fore you start any move­ment in plank po­si­tion, ‘grip’ the floor with your palms by imag­in­ing your­self screw­ing them into the ground. This slight ad­just­ment will pro­tract your shoul­der blades to pre­vent im­pinge­ment.

2 IF YOU CAN’T PER­FORM PULL-UPS TRY CHIN-UPS

Chin-ups put your shoul­ders in a more sta­ble po­si­tion. Plus, since the un­der­hand grip works your bi­ceps and chest mus­cles more than pull-ups do, they’re eas­ier to per­form.

3 IF A BACK SQUAT ISN’T COM­FORT­ABLE TRY DO­ING A GOB­LET SQUAT

When you have tight shoul­ders, hold­ing a bar­bell on your back is likely to elicit shoul­der pain – and an arched back, too. Not good. Gob­let squats, on the other hand, put your shoul­ders in a more com­fort­able po­si­tion, while also train­ing shoul­der sta­bil­ity. Boom.

4 IF A BAR­BELL BENCH PRESS HURTS TRY DUMB­BELLS

“Weight­ing each arm al­lows shoul­ders to fol­low a more nat­u­ral move­ment pat­tern,” says strength and con­di­tion­ing spe­cial­ist Matt Un­thank. It lets you an­gle your palms in­wards, re­duc­ing im­pinge­ment risk.

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