HOW SAFE ARE YOU FROM RIC­O­CHET FIRE UN­DER WA­TER?

World of Knowledge (Australia) - - World of Knowledge -

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In prin­ci­ple, bul­lets fired from a gun or ri­fle be­have in ex­actly the same way un­der­wa­ter as they do above the sur­face. The oxy­gen con­tained in the car­tridge is enough to re­lease the shot, but dur­ing its tra­jec­tory the bul­let quickly loses speed and ro­ta­tion. This means that it drifts off course and sinks to the bot­tom af­ter just two me­tres. As wa­ter is 800 times more dense than air, the bul­let is

sub­ject to ex­tremely strong re­sis­tance. The same prin­ci­ple ap­plies to ric­o­chets, ex­cept the wa­ter de­cel­er­ates the de­formed pro­jec­tile even more se­verely. On ships, bar­rels of wa­ter are used to pro­tect against pi­rates who might fire bul­lets at the boat. These liq­uid shields rob shots of their en­ergy.

Wa­ter is 800 times denser than air. This means it forms an ef­fec­tive pro­tec­tion against ric­o­chets.

RISKY EX­PER­I­MENT Us­ing re­mote con­trol, physi­cist An­dres Wahl fires a loaded gun at him­self from a dis­tance of three me­tres. The wa­ter de­cel­er­ates the shot and there­fore poses no dan­ger.

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