HOW DID SCIENTISTS DIS­COVER HU­MAN DARK MAT­TER?

World of Knowledge (Australia) - - Human Body -

Hu­man DNA is like a huge book con­tain­ing the ex­act in­struc­tions for build­ing a per­son. Here, spread over around three bil­lion pages, is the com­plete pro­tein code. These gene se­quences dic­tate the makeup of a pro­tein and have be­come es­sen­tial to the study of dark mat­ter in the body. That’s be­cause, bio­chem­i­cally speak­ing, dark pro­teins are sim­ple mol­e­cules – and their in­struc­tions are neatly writ­ten in the DNA. To­gether with an in­ter­na­tional re­search team, Dr Bern­hard Kuester from the Tech­ni­cal Univer­sity of Mu­nich has read these blue­prints. Us­ing the hu­man gene map, which lists all of the genes in the genome, the re­searchers were able to find out which pro­teins are ac­tu­ally built by the body. While this doesn’t nec­es­sar­ily tell us any­thing about what they do, it’s pos­si­ble to com­pare these pro­tein as­sem­bly in­struc­tions with the known pro­teome – and, there­fore, get an over­view of the amount of dark mat­ter in the body.

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