Econ­omy Min­istry to ac­cel­er­ate con­struc­tion of lo­gis­tics cen­ter for per­sim­mon pro­duc­ers

Azer News - - Front Page - By Sara Is­rafil­bay­ova

Nowa­days, local farm­ers seek to ex­pand the per­sim­mon pro­duc­tion in Azer­bai­jan through the newly-cre­ated As­so­ci­a­tion of Per­sim­mon Pro­duc­ers and Ex­porters.

Nowa­days, local farm­ers seek to ex­pand the per­sim­mon pro­duc­tion in Azer­bai­jan through the newly-cre­ated As­so­ci­a­tion of Per­sim­mon Pro­duc­ers and Ex­porters.

The main task of the As­so­ci­a­tion, sup­ported by the Econ­omy Min­istry, is to in­crease pro­duc­tion of com­pet­i­tive and ex­port-ori­ented prod­ucts un­der the brand "Made in Azer­bai­jan".

Cur­rently, a lab­o­ra­tory and a lo­gis­tics cen­ter for the As­so­ci­a­tion are be­ing built in the Goy­chay re­gion.

The Econ­omy Min­istry de­cided to speed up the con­struc­tion of the lo­gis­tics cen­ter by pro­vid­ing an ad­di­tional con­ces­sional loan.

The de­ci­sion was made dur­ing the meet­ing of Econ­omy Min­is­ter Shahin Mustafayev with res­i­dents of As­tara, Lerik and Lankaran re­gions in As­tara on Au­gust 31.

The con­struc­tion of the lo­gis­tics cen­ter is ex­pected to be com­pleted by late 2017, which will al­low to in­crease the ex­port vol­umes and ac­cess EU mar­kets.

Per­sim­mon is wide­spread in the trop­i­cal and tem­per­ate cli­matic zones. Home­land of per­sim­mon is con­sid­ered to be the north­ern part of China, but now per­sim­mon is grown in Azer­bai­jan, Ge­or­gia, Greece, Kyr­gyzs­tan, Tur­key, the Crimea, Aus­tralia and other coun­tries. In gen­eral, there are more than 500 kinds of per­sim­mons.

With the ar­rival of fall come per­sim­mons. The fruit is avail­able in Lankaran, Goy­chay, Ag­dash, Ag­dam, Ganja and Za­gatala re­gions of Azer­bai­jan.

Per­sim­mons can be eaten raw, tossed in sal­ads or served along­side dishes. They are a good source of vi­ta­min C and con­tain di­etary fi­bre.

Per­sim­mon trees grow best in sub­trop­i­cal and tem­per­ate cli­mates, pre­fer full sun and should be pro­tected from strong winds. The per­sim­mon tree is de­cid­u­ous and can grow up to 7 me­tres. The tree starts pro­duc­ing fruit af­ter about three or four years of growth. Per­sim­mons grow to about the size of an ap­ple. They start out yel­low and be­come or­ange and even a tan­ger­ine-red color when fully de­vel­oped.

The fruit helps to fight weak­ness, ane­mia, vi­ta­min de­fi­ciency, and chronic gas­troin­testi­nal dis­eases. The fruit is the per­fect source for fiber, phy­tonu­tri­ents, flavonoids, and an­tiox­i­dants. The amount of fruc­tose is high in per­sim­mon, which is why peo­ple should en­joy it care­fully and not eat too much.

More­over, it en­hances the ac­tiv­ity of the di­ges­tive process, reg­u­lates me­tab­o­lism, as well as has a good ef­fect on the treat­ment of dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem.

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