KAREL AP­PEL AND THE CO­BRA MOVE­MENT

ArabAd - - ART - BY: MONA ISKAN­DAR

The Dutch artist Karel Ap­pel (1921 – 2006) was marked by World War ll, which left life-long scars. This made him rebel against the folly of the es­tab­lish­ment that had caused all the dev­as­ta­tion. It also kin­dled his cre­ativ­ity, and with no con­cern for tra­di­tions and con­ven­tions, he be­came free to find his own tech­nique, man­ner of ex­pres­sion and sub­jects.

Ap­pel is con­sid­ered one of the most in­flu­en­tial artists of the post-war gen­er­a­tion in Hol­land. He was an ab­stract painter, known for his fre­netic, wild and edgy style. He used vi­brant and pure colours and a strong brush­stroke and would bring the paint to life in a way that no other artist did. His stroke was not al­ways re­alised with a brush, as the paint could come di­rectly from the tube or he would use a scalpel, a knife or his fin­gers to spread his thick paint. His strokes were chaotic and un­in­hib­ited, end­ing with smears and drips that hid parts of his thick black lines. His glar­ing and star­tling colours could be shock­ing, but his an­swer to such re­ac­tions was: ”if I paint like a barbarian, it’s be­cause we live in a bar­barous age”.

'The Young Desert Fel­low' 1950

'Street Singer' 1952

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