More than 88,000 regis­ter for postal bal­lot

Business Bhutan - - Front Page - Dechen Dolkar

A to­tal of 88,915 el­i­gi­ble vot­ers have regis­tered for the postal bal­lot ser­vices for the third coun­cil elec­tions.

Most el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers, through their or­ga­ni­za­tions have ap­plied for reg­is­tra­tion to the elec­tion com­mis­sion. They in­clude civil ser­vants, stu­dents, the armed force and Bhutanese of­fi­cials based in em­bassies.

The com­mis­sion, among oth­ers, also re­ceived ap­pli­ca­tions from the spouses and di­rect de­pen­dents of civil ser­vants and Bhutanese liv­ing over­seas.

The com­mis­sion has also ex­tended the ser­vice to the cor­po­ra­tions, State Owned En­ter­prises, Civil So­ci­ety Or­ga­ni­za­tions,

me­dia, as­so­ci­a­tions, and some of the pri­vate em­ploy­ees. This time the com­mis­sion has ex­tended postal bal­lot ser­vices to more peo­ple than in the past.

Of the to­tal regis­tered postal vot­ers, 1,964 live over­seas. The high­est postal bal­lot the com­mis­sion re­ceived was from the US and Aus­tralia.

There are also con­ven­tional postal vot­ers for re­mote ar­eas in the coun­try and for those who are on elec­tion duty. This ser­vice is ex­tended for those civil ser­vants who are in the re­motest places like Laya and Lu­nana, where it is dif­fi­cult to set up fa­cil­i­ta­tion booth. There are 209 con­ven­tional postal vot­ers. Con­ven­tional vot­ers are el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers whose postal bal­lots are send as in the past elec­tions.

The Elec­tion Com­mis­sion of Bhutan (ECB) will in­tro­duce postal bal­lot polling booth and mo­bile polling booth to fa­cil­i­tate the postal bal­lot vot­ers for the third par­lia­men­tary elec­tions.

In the en­tire coun­try, there will be 64 fa­cil­i­ta­tion booths. Thim­phu has the high­est num­ber of eight fa­cil­i­ta­tion booths.

Of the to­tal postal vot­ers, 59,743 will be cast­ing votes in the polling booths across the coun­try.

For the mo­bile polling booth, the com­mis­sion has re­ceived 843 el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers from pris­on­ers and the dif­fer­ently-abled.

Trashigang has the high­est num­ber of el­i­gi­ble postal bal­lot vot­ers with 12,109 fol­lowed by Mon­gar with 8,500. Gasa has the low­est num­ber of el­i­gi­ble postal bal­lot vot­ers with 207 fol­lowed by Haa with 1,485.

For the first coun­cil elec­tions, while the com­mis­sion re­ceived 20,992 ap­pli­ca­tions, only about 23% of the votes were counted. In the sec­ond coun­cil elec­tions 40,701 ap­pli­ca­tions were re­ceived of which only 23,967 were valid postal bal­lots.

Mis­takes in iden­tity card num­bers and mail­ing ad­dresses and skip­ping de­tails of com­pe­tent wit­ness were some of the rea­sons for postal votes get­ting re­jected.

The elec­tion com­mis­sion has set­tled for Nu 90 for ev­ery trans­ac­tion of a postal bal­lot, which re­turn­ing of­fi­cers need to send back to the vot­ers. For ev­ery postal voter, Nu 180 is be­ing in­vested. That way, the cost would run into mil­lions.

For the first coun­cil elec­tions, the cost for each bal­lot trans­ac­tion was ne­go­ti­ated at Nu 70 and for the sec­ond coun­cil elec­tions, the cost for each bal­lot trans­ac­tion was ne­go­ti­ated at Nu 80.

The com­mis­sion has al­ready start­ing dis­patch­ing the postal bal­lots to re­spec­tive re­turn­ing of­fi­cers across the coun­try.

Also, re­turn­ing of­fi­cers have ini­ti­ated send­ing postal bal­lots to the regis­tered postal vot­ers from March 22.

The fa­cil­i­ta­tion and mo­bile booths will be set up on April 12,13 and 14 for three days.

The last date for re­ceiv­ing postal bal­lots for the re­turn­ing of­fi­cers will be till 5pm on April 19. The postal bal­lots re­ceived af­ter 5pm on April 19 will be not be counted.

Dechen Dolkar from Thim­phu

A to­tal of 88,915 el­i­gi­ble vot­ers have regis­tered for the postal bal­lot ser­vices for the third coun­cil elec­tions.

Most el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers, through their or­ga­ni­za­tions have ap­plied for reg­is­tra­tion to the elec­tion com­mis­sion. They in­clude civil ser­vants, stu­dents, the armed force and Bhutanese of­fi­cials based in em­bassies.

The com­mis­sion, among oth­ers, also re­ceived ap­pli­ca­tions from the spouses and di­rect de­pen­dents of civil ser­vants and Bhutanese liv­ing over­seas.

The com­mis­sion has also ex­tended the ser­vice to the cor­po­ra­tions, State Owned En­ter­prises, Civil So­ci­ety Or­ga­ni­za­tions, me­dia, as­so­ci­a­tions, and some of the pri­vate em­ploy­ees. This time the com­mis­sion has ex­tended postal bal­lot ser­vices to more peo­ple than in the past.

Of the to­tal regis­tered postal vot­ers, 1,964 live over­seas. The high­est postal bal­lot the com­mis­sion re­ceived was from the US and Aus­tralia.

There are also con­ven­tional postal vot­ers for re­mote ar­eas in the coun­try and for those who are on elec­tion duty. This ser­vice is ex­tended for those civil ser­vants who are in the re­motest places like Laya and Lu­nana, where it is dif­fi­cult to set up fa­cil­i­ta­tion booth. There are 209 con­ven­tional postal vot­ers. Con­ven­tional vot­ers are el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers whose postal bal­lots are send as in the past elec­tions.

The Elec­tion Com­mis­sion of Bhutan (ECB) will in­tro­duce postal bal­lot polling booth and mo­bile polling booth to fa­cil­i­tate the postal bal­lot vot­ers for the third par­lia­men­tary elec­tions.

In the en­tire coun­try, there will be 64 fa­cil­i­ta­tion booths. Thim­phu has the high­est num­ber of eight fa­cil­i­ta­tion booths.

Of the to­tal postal vot­ers, 59,743 will be cast­ing votes in the polling booths across the coun­try.

For the mo­bile polling booth, the com­mis­sion has re­ceived 843 el­i­gi­ble postal vot­ers from pris­on­ers and the dif­fer­ently-abled.

Trashigang has the high­est num­ber of el­i­gi­ble postal bal­lot vot­ers with 12,109 fol­lowed by Mon­gar with 8,500. Gasa has the low­est num­ber of el­i­gi­ble postal bal­lot vot­ers with 207 fol­lowed by Haa with 1,485.

For the first coun­cil elec­tions, while the com­mis­sion re­ceived 20,992 ap­pli­ca­tions, only about 23% of the votes were counted. In the sec­ond coun­cil elec­tions 40,701 ap­pli­ca­tions were re­ceived of which only 23,967 were valid postal bal­lots.

Mis­takes in iden­tity card num­bers and mail­ing ad­dresses and skip­ping de­tails of com­pe­tent wit­ness were some of the rea­sons for postal votes get­ting re­jected.

The elec­tion com­mis­sion has set­tled for Nu 90 for ev­ery trans­ac­tion of a postal bal­lot, which re­turn­ing of­fi­cers need to send back to the vot­ers. For ev­ery postal voter, Nu 180 is be­ing in­vested. That way, the cost would run into mil­lions.

For the first coun­cil elec­tions, the cost for each bal­lot trans­ac­tion was ne­go­ti­ated at Nu 70 and for the sec­ond coun­cil elec­tions, the cost for each bal­lot trans­ac­tion was ne­go­ti­ated at Nu 80.

The com­mis­sion has al­ready start­ing dis­patch­ing the postal bal­lots to re­spec­tive re­turn­ing of­fi­cers across the coun­try.

Also, re­turn­ing of­fi­cers have ini­ti­ated send­ing postal bal­lots to the regis­tered postal vot­ers from March 22.

The fa­cil­i­ta­tion and mo­bile booths will be set up on April 12,13 and 14 for three days.

The last date for re­ceiv­ing postal bal­lots for the re­turn­ing of­fi­cers will be till 5pm on April 19. The postal bal­lots re­ceived af­ter 5pm on April 19 will be not be counted.

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