Off Grid Trail­ers

4WDrive - - Feature -

Some of the best trail rigs just don’t have enough room for an over­land trip. Which is why there are quite a few com­pa­nies that build rugged, light­weight trail­ers that you can tow into the wilds. These trail­ers pro­vide ev­ery­thing from a bit of ex­tra stor­age to a full camp out RV ex­pe­ri­ence. One of these is Cana­dian com­pany Off Grid Trail­ers, out of Black­falds, Al­berta. 4WD spoke with Mark Badgerow about how and why he got into the busi­ness and what sets Off Grid Trail­ers apart from the pack. 4WD:

With so many RV and off-road trailer com­pa­nies out there, what made you get into the busi­ness?

Badgerow:

Well, it all started out when I wanted to go out and buy a turnkey trailer, and dis­cov­ered all the trail­ers that I wanted were WAY outta my price range. I couldn’t af­ford them... so I got the great idea of just de­sign­ing one us­ing Solid­works, and then weld it to­gether. Soon enough some­one wanted to buy it from me so I made an­other one. I made some im­prove­ments, learned from my mis­takes on my first trailer, and it ba­si­cally took off from there.

4WD:

What would you say has been your big­gest chal­lenge in get­ting Off Grid Trail­ers ‘off’ the ground?

Badgerow:

I would say my big­gest chal­lenge even now is fund­ing. It costs money to go out to shows, and while many deal­ers have shown a lot of in­ter­est in my units, I need the ad­di­tional fund­ing to make a few to put them on dealer lots.

4WD:

What is your most pop­u­lar unit and why? Badgerow: My most pop­u­lar unit for the time be­ing is the Pando, with its queen size mat­tress, sink, stove, hot wa­ter, and propane fur­nace for those cold nights. But I am pretty sure that my Over­lan­der unit will be more pop­u­lar. It’s a foot taller and has tons more stor­age. I think the big­gest de­sign fea­ture that sets them apart from your typ­i­cal RV is that they are short and have a re­ally solid frame that will last a life­time. Other im­por­tant fea­tures in­clude the 58 cm (23") of ground clear­ance and in­de­pen­dent sus­pen­sion.

4WD:

Nat­u­rally, I have to ask why your trail­ers are bet­ter than the com­pe­ti­tion.

Badgerow:

I re­ally hate to say that my trail­ers are bet­ter than theirs, but if I had to pick out one thing, I would men­tion that my trail­ers are fully in­su­lated where a lot of my com­peti­tors just use 3/4" ply­wood for the cabin walls. Off Grid Trail­ers are fully spray foamed and use an alu­minum skele­ton - you can walk on the roof of my units with out hav­ing to worry about go­ing through. Also cus­tomiza­tion. Since I am a small com­pany and do all the de­sign­ing my­self, I am eas­ily able to in­cor­po­rate a cus­tomer’s ideas.

4WD:

What do you see for the fu­ture of off-road trail­ers?

Badgerow:

I see a lot of growth in this mar­ket. A lot of the larger RV com­pa­nies are start­ing to make sim­i­lar units but in “RV GRADE” ways .... if you have ever owned an RV trailer you will know what I mean by that.

4WD:

Any last thoughts to share?

Badgerow:

You don’t need a lot to be com­pat­i­ble with my units; the av­er­age weight is around 2000 lbs, so al­most all small SUV’s and trucks can pull them. I was at Expo west this year, and I’ll be at a few other shows - that’s the eas­i­est way to see my units, or if you hap­pen to come across some­one with one. One day I will get some on dealer lots but for the time be­ing I will have to just keep chug­ging along.

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