7 steps to a suc­cess­ful trip

Best Health - - YOU -

1. MAKE SURE YOUR VAC­CI­NA­TIONS ARE UP TO DATE.

Talk to your doc­tor, as cer­tain live vac­cines may not be ap­pro­pri­ate, de­pend­ing on your treat­ment.

2. BOOK THROUGH A TRAVEL AGENT.

This can save you time and money in the long run. Most have sup­pli­ers around the world that can ar­range med­i­cal re­quire­ments on the ground. Ad­di­tion­ally, they can con­tact air­line med­i­cal desks on your be­half and get “fit to fly” forms to your doc­tor. Any­body with a ma­jor med­i­cal is­sue should com­plete these forms one month be­fore fly­ing.

3. DON’T AS­SUME YOU DON’T QUAL­IFY FOR TRAVEL IN­SUR­ANCE.

As long as your doc­tor ver­i­fies that you’re sta­ble and con­trolled 14 to 90 days (de­pen­dent on age) prior to travel, you could be fine. “Sta­ble and con­trolled” is de­fined as “hav­ing no change in treat­ment or med­i­ca­tions.”

4. PACK EX­TRA PRE­SCRIP­TIONS.

Keep all med­i­ca­tions in their orig­i­nal bot­tles; with pre­scrip­tions in your carry-on lug­gage. Carry a let­ter from your doc­tor de­scrib­ing the med­i­ca­tions you’re car­ry­ing (list­ing both the generic and com­mer­cial names), along with a prog­no­sis note that sum­ma­rizes your di­ag­no­sis and re­cent treat­ments.

5. EN­SURE THAT YOU HAVE YOUR MED­I­CAL TEAM ON SPEED DIAL.

Some­times a quick call to your doc­tor or triage nurse can solve a prob­lem.

6. PLOT OUT WHERE THE CLOS­EST MED­I­CAL FA­CIL­ITY IS.

Know­ing this ahead of time can save a lot of angst in case of an emer­gency.

7. EX­PLORE WORST-CASE SCE­NAR­IOS.

Do you want to be hos­pi­tal­ized or stay in your ho­tel room? Re­al­ize that your travel part­ner might panic and ad­mit you to hos­pi­tal any­way, whether or not you have travel in­sur­ance.

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