50 Ways to Make Travel Hap­pier

Busi­ness Trav­eler has some sug­ges­tions to keep mind, body and soul in check on the road

Business Traveler (USA) - - FRONT PAGE -

Don’t make life hard for your­self. Busi­ness Trav­eler has some sug­ges­tions to keep mind, body and soul in check on the road

1 BOOK FLIGHTS IN­TEL­LI­GENTLY

Weigh price over con­ve­nience – ar­riv­ing in the mid­dle of the night or at rush hour has its draw­backs, as do long lay­overs and doglegs. Con­sider what time you will have to get up to catch that 6:00 AM flight. Don’t make life hard for your­self.

2 DON’T OB­SESS OVER MILES

Fo­cus­ing on how many points you earn can be­come ad­dic­tive. Try fly­ing a dif­fer­ent air­line, pay ex­tra to stay in a ho­tel you re­ally love – per­haps an un­branded bou­tique prop­erty – and re­mem­ber that sta­tus isn’t ev­ery­thing.

3

BE OR­GA­NIZED

Poor plan­ning can re­sult in missed meet­ings and gen­eral con­fu­sion. Carry a de­tailed itin­er­ary, keep doc­u­ments in one place, and sync your smart­phone with your desk­top cal­en­dar.

4 DE­CIDE YOUR OWN BLACK-OUT DATES

There are cer­tain days of

8

BE PUNC­TUAL

There is lit­tle worse than rush­ing to an air­port only to re­al­ize you have missed your flight. Build in enough time to stay on sched­ule. And don’t be overly-op­ti­mistic about how many ap­point­ments you can squeeze into one day. the year – birthdays and an­niver­saries in par­tic­u­lar – when you might not want to travel. Mark th­ese off in your day plan­ner and don’t book a trip that clashes with them. Make sure you are get­ting your pri­or­i­ties right.

5

DRESS FOR THE AIR 6

WEAR SLIP-ON SHOES 7 TAKE STOCK OF YOUR STOCK­INGS

Dress codes for fliers have be­come re­laxed – some would say dis­ap­peared en­tirely. But you can still ar­rive look­ing ready for busi­ness with some smart wardrobe choices. Shop for wrin­kle-free jack­ets and slacks, dresses or skirts, so you still look sharp when you land.

Don’t fum­ble with laces at air­port se­cu­rity – in­vest in some qual­ity slip-on loafers, deck shoes or pumps. Long flights or sit­ting for hours in client meet­ings can lead to leg dis­com­fort and se­ri­ous com­pli­ca­tions like deep vein throm­bo­sis (DVT). Com­pres­sion stock­ings

aren’t cheap, but they can keep your legs feel­ing healthy and en­er­gized.Visit com­pres­sion­stock­ings.com.

9 USE A MO­BILE WALLET

Ap­ple’s iPhone Pass­book app stores mo­bile board­ing passes, coupons, loy­alty and re­ward cards in one place, and will even alert you when your flight is leav­ing. Lemon (An­droid, iOS and Win­dows Phone) and Google Wallet are other op­tions.

10

WAKE UP GEN­TLY

A blar­ing alarm clock in­stantly puts you in a bad mood. Try down­load­ing mu­sic or the sound of the sea to your phone and ease your­self into con­scious­ness.

11 BUY THE BEST BRIEF­CASE

For the 007 in you, check out Globe Trot­ter’s James Bond col­lec­tion of slim at­tachés (the 16-inch retails for $1,435; glo­be­trot­ter1897.com).

12 RE­FRESH YOUR KIT BAG

In­vest in a durable toi­letry bag you can use for both short- and long-haul trips and that will look classy if you get searched at the air­port.

13 PRO­TECT AGAINST THEFT

Fit your suit­case with a TSA-ap­proved lock or choose lug­gage with one built in.

14

FEED YOUR MIND

The free Phi­los­o­phy Bites app (iPhone and iPad), TED Talks, StuffYou Should Know, Freako­nomics Ra­dio, In Our Time with Melvyn Bragg, 60-Sec­ond Science and The In­fi­nite Mon­key Cage will all ex­pand your mind in min­utes.

16 DOWN­LOAD AN AU­DIO BOOK

Have some­one tell you a story. Down­load a good book to your iPhone, An­droid, Kin­dle Fire, Win­dows Phone or MP3 play­ers.

17

LIS­TEN TO MU­SIC

Try down­load­ing a new al­bum be­fore each trip.Visit pitch­fork.com or stere­ogum. com for re­views and sam­ples. Free ra­dio plat­form Mix­cloud al­lows you to stream ra­dio and DJ mix sets to your An­droid or Ap­ple de­vice.

18 PAY FOR LOUNGE AC­CESS

Fly­ing econ­omy doesn’t mean you have to miss out on chill­ing in an air­port lounge. In­de­pen­dent lounge op­er­a­tors

15 CHOOSE THE PER­FECT CASE

In­vest­ing in smart, re­li­able lug­gage will make pack­ing that bit more plea­sur­able and trav­el­ing that bit more bear­able. For short-haul trips, choose the size wisely to keep the over­head to a min­i­mum. like Plaza Pre­mium, The Club at… and Airspace Lounges of­fer ac­cess on a per-visit ba­sis. Or sign up to Pri­or­ity Pass or Air­port An­gel, which of­fer ac­cess for an­nual fees.

20 DOC­U­MENT YOUR MEM­O­RIES

“We write to taste life twice, in the mo­ment and in ret­ro­spec­tion,”said Anais Nin. Start a diary to record travel ex­pe­ri­ences you want to re­mem­ber.

21

POINT AND CLICK

Apps such as In­sta­gram and Cam­era Bag mean it’s eas­ier than ever to take good pho­tos when you’re on the road. Try to snap one well com­posed shot each trip – it will help you be­come sen­si­tive to the beau­ti­ful and in­ter­est­ing things around you.

22 COM­MIT TO BE­ING FIT

Make the ef­fort to ex­er­cise and not only will your body thank you, but so will your mind. For mo­ti­va­tion, wear a Nike+ Fuel Band (nike.com /fuelband) or Fit Bit ac­tiv­ity tracker (fit­bit. com). If you don’t like gyms, try a work­out DVD.

19 SEEK SHADE

All glo­be­trot­ters need some good sun­glasses. Pe­ruse duty-free for the frames that best suit your fea­tures. For a hip look, try Rock Op­tika’s retro-in­spired eyewear (rock­op­tika.co.uk).

23

LEARN THE LINGO

Know­ing just a few words or phrases in the lo­cal lan­guage can be a great help – plus, peo­ple will have more re­spect for you.

24

BE A FLA­NEUR

Usu­ally get­ting lost is a ma­jor in­con­ve­nience but if you have some free time, a lot can be said for ditch­ing the map and head­ing out for an ex­plore – you will make un­ex­pected dis­cov­er­ies and see a side to the city you wouldn’t oth­er­wise.

25 GET BACK TO NA­TURE

Take a stroll through a park, get down to the beach or find some wood­land. Just a short time in na­ture will help melt stress away.

26 ES­TAB­LISH A HAUNT

Find a cof­fee shop or restau­rant you love in a city that you fre­quent and visit it each time you’re in town – it will make you feel at home.

33

TACK ON SOME VA­CA­TION 27

GET FRESH AIR 28

STAY HY­DRATED 29 CALL YOUR FRIENDS 30

DO A GOOD DEED 31

BE AP­PRE­CIA­TIVE

Breath­ing re­cy­cled air on planes dries out your skin and leaves you feel­ing stuffy, so when you dis­em­bark, get out­doors as soon as pos­si­ble.

Drink lots of wa­ter. Look for the com­pli­men­tary bot­tle in the ho­tel in­stead of hit­ting the mini­bar, and al­ways have a bot­tle with you on the plane. If you know peo­ple in the city you are go­ing to on busi­ness, clear your diary to spend time with them one evening.

In­vest in your karmic bank bal­ance by be­ing gen­er­ous of heart and wallet.

Try to keep things in per­spec­tive. It’s easy to get cyn­i­cal, ir­ri­ta­ble and de­mand­ing when you travel fre­quently, but re­mem­ber the Con­sider adding on a cou­ple of days’leisure time to ex­plore the city you are in, or es­cape to a nearby beach for some down­time.

36

TRY ARO­MATHER­APY

Es­sen­tial oils can im­prove your mood and cog­ni­tive func­tion­ing – pack a cou­ple of small bot­tles and in­hale the next time you need re­lax­ing or re­ju­ve­nat­ing. po­si­tion of priv­i­lege you have and look on the bright side; it can do won­ders for your tem­per.

32 CRE­ATE TIME FOR YOU

It’s the days when you feel you are too busy to stop that you re­ally should take a mo­ment’s pause – even a few min­utes to your­self can work won­ders. Take a run or take in some cul­ture. Sleep or watch a movie in­stead of work­ing on the plane.

34 TAKE A LONG BREAK

Re­mem­ber, travel doesn’t al­ways have to be as­so­ci­ated with busi­ness. When was the last time you took a week – or even two – off work? Book the va­ca­tion you have al­ways dreamed of.

35

EAT SEN­SI­BLY 37

DRINK LESS 38 TURN OFF YOUR GAD­GETS

Skip dessert, don’t snack and go easy at the break­fast buffet. If you are putting on weight, con­sider the 5/2 fast­ing diet, where you eat no more than 600 calo­ries (500 for women) for two non-con­sec­u­tive days a week, and the rest of the time eat nor­mally.

There is noth­ing worse than hav­ing to face an im­por­tant day or long jour­ney with a hang­over. Learn some self-con­trol and keep an eye on your units. It’s all too easy to be­come ad­dicted to check­ing your e-mails, Face­book and Twit­ter ac­counts. If you feel you re­ally

need help get­ting it un­der con­trol, con­sider down­load­ing soft­ware such as Freedom or Anti-So­cial (for Macs and PCs), or An­droid’s Dig­i­tal Detox app, which dis­ables the on­line/so­cial ele­ments of your de­vices for a set time.

39 MAN­AGE YOUR STRESS

Trav­el­ing reg­u­larly can af­fect your men­tal state as it is un­pre­dictable, tir­ing and fraught with po­ten­tial prob­lems. Don’t let it get you down. For more in­for­ma­tion check out the Amer­i­can In­sti­tute of Stress (stress.org).

40

MED­I­TATE

It’s easy to do on a plane, train or in a ho­tel room, and po­ten­tial ben­e­fits

41

TIP GEN­ER­OUSLY

range from re­duced stress to lower blood pres­sure. Down­load the Headspace app (get­some­headspace.com) for iPhone/An­droid for ten­minute med­i­ta­tions.

42

SMILE

Tip­ping cul­ture around the world is com­pli­cated – in some places it’s de rigueur and in oth­ers it’s con­sid­ered un­nec­es­sary. But if in doubt, there is no harm in of­fer­ing a lit­tle some­thing. Just re­mem­ber to un­der­stand the lo­cal cur­rency and carry small bills.

This sim­ple hu­man ex­pres­sion can be more pow­er­ful than you think. Do it, and oth­ers will re­spond more pos­i­tively to you.

43 TALK TO YOUR FAM­ILY

Sched­ule reg­u­lar slots to speak to your loved ones on the phone or via Skype. They will worry less and it may ease any lone­li­ness.

44 SEND A POST­CARD 50 SHARE YOUR KNOWL­EDGE

Trav­el­ing fre­quently means you build up a wealth of in­for­ma­tion about the cities you visit, ho­tels you stay in and air­lines you fly with. On­line fo­rums such as busi­nesstrav­elerusa. com/dis­cus­sion and re­view sites such as seat­plans.com are a great way to share your ex­pe­ri­ence with oth­ers. Th­ese days, it is easy to for­get what it’s like to pick up a pen and pa­per, let alone go to the ef­fort of send­ing a card. But for the older rel­a­tive in your life, re­ceiv­ing one could make their day.

45 GO ON A GUS­TA­TORY AD­VEN­TURE

Try some­thing dif­fer­ent – or­der a dish you have never heard of, ac­cept the chef’s rec­om­men­da­tion, buy some street food, drink the lo­cal tip­ple and eat any­thing you are of­fered (within rea­son).

46 TALK TO STRANGERS

Have a chat with your taxi driver or waiter about where to go and what to see. Most peo­ple are happy to talk, es­pe­cially when they get a sense their opin­ion is of value.

47

DON’T DRIVE

Driv­ing in an un­fa­mil­iar ve­hi­cle in a place you don’t know – es­pe­cially if it’s on the other side of the road – can ratchet up your stress lev­els like lit­tle else. If you can, leave the driv­ing to some­one else, or take pub­lic trans­port.

48 USE AN ON-DE­MAND CHAUF­FEUR SER­VICE

Down­load free GroundLink app (for iPhone and An­droid, groundlink.com) and at the touch of a but­ton a lux­ury car will pull up to the curb in min­utes. The app links to your credit card, so no cash changes hands, tolls and tips are in­cluded and it works in more than 5,000 cities world­wide.

49

STAY AT HOME

If you’re dread­ing an up­com­ing trip, ask your­self if you re­ally have to go. Know and re­spect your (and your fam­ily’s) lim­its, and don’t be a mar­tyr. BT

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