WHEN SHOULD YOU PRUNE?

Canadian Gardening Annual 2016 - - How-to -

It’s wrong to think that ef­fec­tive prun­ing can be done at any time. As a gen­eral rule of thumb, avoid prun­ing any flow­er­ing shrub in late sum­mer or au­tumn be­cause this can stim­u­late ten­der new growth, which is sus­cep­ti­ble to dam­age by cold tem­per­a­tures.

SPRING FLOW­ER­ING SHRUBS,

such as for­sythia, pur­ple sand­cherry, flow­er­ing al­mond, li­lac and mock­o­r­ange, bloom on the pre­vi­ous sea­son’s growth, some­times re­ferred to as “old wood.” In other words, the flow­ers we see this spring ac­tu­ally de­vel­oped on the plant late last sum­mer. For max­i­mum flower pro­duc­tion next year, prune spring flow­er­ing shrubs im­me­di­ately af­ter blooms fade.

SUM­MER AND EARLY AU­TUMN FLOW­ER­ING SHRUBS,

such as but­ter­fly bush, Peegee hy­drangea, roses and rose of Sharon, bloom on the cur­rent sea­son’s growth or “new wood,” which means flow­ers have de­vel­oped since growth started that spring. Th­ese plants should be pruned just as growth starts in early spring be­fore buds form.

Prun­ing Hy­drangea pan­ic­u­lata to an out­ward-fac­ing bud (ref­er­ence step 3 on next page).

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Canada

© PressReader. All rights reserved.