Make room for more ap­ple cider vine­gar in your diet

Vine­gar is an an­cient elixir that has been a well­ness sta­ple since the days of Hip­pocrates and con­tin­ues to be used as a mod­ern-day rem­edy.

Canadian Living - - CONTENTS - TEXT GRACE TOBY RECIPE JEN­NIFER DANTER & THE TEST KITCHEN

Ap­ple cider vine­gar is made from fer­mented ap­ples. Choose the raw, un­fil­tered kind, in which you’ll find the “mother,” strands of ben­e­fi­cial pro­teins, en­zymes and gut-friendly bac­te­ria that give the liq­uid a cloudy ap­pear­ance. THE BEN­E­FITS Rachel Bies, a Toronto-based holis­tic nu­tri­tion­ist, shares some of cider vine­gar’s nu­tri­tional high­lights. Cider vine­gar’s pre­bi­otic com­pounds add friendly flora (good bac­te­ria) to your gut, fa­cil­i­tat­ing di­ges­tion and aid­ing vi­ta­min and min­eral ab­sorp­tion. It con­tains potas­sium (an elec­trolyte that helps keep sodium lev­els in check) and mag­ne­sium, which helps boost en­ergy lev­els and calm nerves. Cider vine­gar ranks low on the ph scale, and once con­sumed, it has an al­ka­line ef­fect that acts as a

bal­anc­ing agent. Aim for a healthy ph by eat­ing more al­ka­line foods (veg­eta­bles and grains) than acidic ones (meat and cheese).

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