MAN­AG­ING PSYCHODERMATOLOGIC DIS­OR­DERS

Al­though there’s no one-size-fits-all treat­ment plan when it comes to skin con­di­tions, there are a few things you can do to man­age these dis­or­ders.

Canadian Living - - Body Talk -

1. WATCH WHAT YOU EAT

The food we put into our bod­ies can make a big dif­fer­ence in our skin. Cal­gary-based reg­is­tered di­eti­tian Grace Wong ex­plains that “di­etary changes may help al­le­vi­ate the symp­tom if a food in­tol­er­ance is in­volved,” not­ing that some skin con­di­tions like eczema may be trig­gered by food in­tol­er­ances. In some cases, drink­ing lots of wa­ter and eat­ing a diet rich in anti-in­flam­ma­tory foods will help main­tain healthy skin.

2. TREAT YOUR SKIN WITH TLC

Some cos­met­ics, de­ter­gents or skin-care prod­ucts may trig­ger a re­ac­tion, so de­ter­mine if your skin is sen­si­tive to spe­cific in­gre­di­ents by read­ing la­bels and patch-test­ing new prod­ucts be­fore ap­ply­ing to a larger area. Choose un­scented prod­ucts for­mu­lated for sen­si­tive skin. Re­mem­ber to gen­tly pat your skin dry with a towel rather than rub­bing or wip­ing. If you have sen­si­tive skin, speak to a der­ma­tol­o­gist about what prod­ucts are best for you.

3. MIN­I­MIZE TRIG­GERS

Pro­tect your­self from the sun by us­ing an SPF 30 or higher; don’t scratch or pick at your skin or break­outs; wash your hands of­ten; use a cool-mist hu­mid­i­fier at night to help rem­edy dry­ness; and stop smok­ing.

4. TRY MIND­FUL­NESS

Stress-man­age­ment tech­niques such as med­i­ta­tion and yoga, which help you fo­cus on some­thing, like your breath­ing, can help calm your mind and al­ter brain ac­tiv­ity. In ad­di­tion, re­cent stud­ies have shown that med­i­ta­tion can sup­press the re­sponse of in­flam­ma­tion-pro­mot­ing genes. Sign us up!

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