Ex­er­cises

The Com­plete Run­ner’s Work­out, Part 3

Canadian Running - - SEPTEM­BER & OC­TO­BER 2017 -

Be sure to check out our May/June is­sue for part one and our July/Au­gust is­sue for part 2 of this se­ries.

Bal­ance squats Why it’s done

We typ­i­cally per­form ex­er­cises on a sta­ble sur­face like the ground. Tak­ing them into an un­sta­ble en­vi­ron­ment trig­gers mus­cle ac­ti­va­tion that re­quires more fo­cus to im­prove strength in the over­all move­ment pat­tern. Us­ing the ex­er­cise ball for squats (jelly side up) en­sures the run­ner will ac­ti­vate their ad­duc­tors (in­side of thighs) to main­tain po­si­tion through­out the move­ment. Your per­oneals (found on the out­sides of the shins) must turn on to help sta­bi­lize from the ground up at the bot­tom and top of each rep.

How it’s done

It’s im­por­tant to rec­og­nize this ex­er­cise is a tempo move­ment, not a race. Con­trol and sta­bil­ity are the fo­cus here. Care­fully stand­ing on top of the ex­er­cise ball, find your feet just out­side hip width. Slowly lower down into a squat po­si­tion us­ing your arms to help bal­ance at the bot­tom of the rep (some call this the zom­bie squat po­si­tion). Press your knees out as you drop, and ac­tively en­gage your ad­duc­tors (in­side of thighs) to cre­ate more sta­bil­ity, squeez­ing the ex­er­cise ball.

REC­OM­MENDED 10–15 timed reps (3 sec­ond drop, 2 sec­ond hold at bot­tom, 1 sec­ond lift back to start­ing po­si­tion) x 3–5 sets.

Squat Rows Why it’s done

The squat row is per­formed to al­low the run­ner to sit back with con­fi­dence and fo­cus on pos­tural align­ment. Your up­per body pos­ture is ex­tremely im­por­tant. Pair­ing the up­per body pull move­ment with a lower body push move­ment en­cour­ages harder mo­tor pro­gram­ming and chal­lenges you to cre­ate a sense of pre­cise mus­cu­lar ac­ti­va­tion dur­ing the ex­er­cise.

How it’s done

Start­ing in the bot­tom (squat) po­si­tion with a band or cable with man­age­able re­sis­tance, ini­ti­ate the move­ment from the lower body first. Fo­cus on glute ac­ti­va­tion as you drive your hips for­ward and be­gin to pull the cable in to­wards your lower rips. Squeeze your shoul­der blades to­gether and make sure your shoul­ders stay down away from your ears. REC­OM­MENDED Lighter re­sis­tance and higher vol­ume (20–30 reps) for mul­ti­ple sets (3–5) at a con­trolled pace, rest 30–45 sec­onds be­tween sets.

Banded squat thrusts Why it’s done

Band re­sis­tance pro­vides in­creased dif­fi­culty as you ex­tend the move­ment to the fin­ished po­si­tion. The bands re­mind you to ac­cel­er­ate your hips through the rep early, which en­cour­age glute ac­ti­va­tion. This is a power ex­er­cise work­ing on speed through the rep at a higher level of banded re­sis­tances.

How it’s done

With the bands locked be­hind you both at a 45-de­gree an­gle and sit­ting above your hip line, slowly lower into a reg­u­lar squat po­si­tion with the band en­cour­ag­ing your hips to sit back. Drive up from the bot­tom of the rep driv­ing your hips for­ward by squeez­ing your glutes in the back. REC­OM­MENDED Per­form the move­ment with a load­ing phase, static phase and dy­namic phase. Load­ing (ec­cen­tric) phase 3 sec­onds drop­ping slowly into the rep, static hold of 2 sec­onds at the bot­tom of the squat to show con­trol, dy­namic (con­cen­tric) phase is for power at 1 sec­ond into the lift Re­peat 10–15 reps for 3–5 sets with 45 sec­onds rest be­tween sets.

Banded lunges Why it’s done

Safely in­crease the dif­fi­culty of the lunge by adding a band around your hips. The band changes the load of the lunge to cre­ate more fo­cus on sta­bi­liz­ing mus­cles. Pri­mar­ily, the glute on the front leg will need to fire in or­der to pre­vent an un­sta­ble rep. This ex­er­cise is used as a tempo move­ment to chal­lenge and iso­late the sta­bi­liz­ers in the lunge po­si­tion.

How its done

With a band over your hips pulling you to one side, step for­ward with the in­side leg and per­form a tra­di­tional static po­si­tion lunge (straight up and down with feet planted). Fo­cus on your hip and shoul­der po­si­tion keep­ing both square through­out the rep. REC­OM­MENDED Load­ing (ec­cen­tric) phase 3 sec­onds drop­ping slowly into the rep, static hold of 2 sec­onds at the bot­tom of the lunge to show con­trol, dy­namic (con­cen­tric) phase is for power at 1 sec­ond into the lift Re­peat 10–15 reps/side for 3–5 sets with 45 sec­onds rest be­tween sets.

Core Ro­ta­tions (low to high) Why it’s done

Ro­ta­tional strength in run­ning helps en­cour­age full ac­ti­va­tion of the core and in­crease the back to front strength of the trunk. More sup­port from the mid­line as your foun­da­tion will im­prove all ar­eas of your run­ning. The added en­gage­ment of the lower body and up­per body through­out the move­ment cre­ates more of a de­mand on full body strength.

How it’s done

Set up a cable or band in a low po­si­tion off to your side. With your out­side (fur­ther away) hand grip­ping first, over­lap with the in­side hand. Fol­low your hands with your eyes through­out the en­tire rep. While load­ing your in­side leg to start, slowly corkscrew down keep­ing your torso tall (lim­it­ing the load on the low back). Drive off your in­side leg and ex­tend your reach up and away from the start­ing po­si­tion. Keep the band at a 45-de­gree an­gle through­out the rep and re­mem­ber to use your lower body to start, up­per body to fin­ish and core all the way through the move­ment. REC­OM­MENDED 15–20 reps x 3–5 sets, 45 sec­onds rest be­tween sides.

Foam Rolling Why it’s done

Ben­e­fits in­clude: in­creased cir­cu­la­tion, re­duced ex­er­cise re­lated sore­ness, im­proved flex­i­bil­ity and join range of mo­tion, in­jury preven­tion.

How it’s done

This photo shows Tasha rolling her IT-band, a con­sis­tently ne­glected area amongst run­ners. At­tempt to slowly roll your IT-band with one leg on top and one on the ground to start. Slowly work your way into both legs sus­pended (as seen in photo). This can be quite un­com­fort­able, move slow and work from your knee to your hip and back again. REC­OM­MENDED Per­form daily 2–4 min­utes per leg. Phillip Up­ton is a trainer at Van­cou­ver’s In­no­va­tive Fit­ness. Olympian Natasha Wo­dak is the Cana­dian 10,000m record holder.

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