A RISE IN BLOOD GLU­COSE LEV­ELS CAN BE CAUSED BY:

Diabetes Care Guide (English) - - RETAIL NEWS -

An in­crease in the amount and/or type of car­bo­hy­drates you eat

Most foods, ex­cept fats and meats, con­tain car­bo­hy­drates. When you eat foods that have a high con­cen­tra­tion of car­bo­hy­drates per serv­ing, or you have an in­creased amount of your usual foods, your blood glu­cose will rise.

Glu­cose re­leased by the liver overnight

Your body re­quires glu­cose 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Your liver stores glu­cose and re­leases it dur­ing the night. With type 2 di­a­betes, your liver can some­times re­lease too much glu­cose. This ex­plains why your glu­cose may be higher in the morn­ing than be­fore you went to bed – even when you’ve had noth­ing to eat.

Ill­ness

An ill­ness can pose spe­cial prob­lems for peo­ple who have di­a­betes. Ill­ness is a stress on your body that can cause your blood glu­cose lev­els to go up. Even a mi­nor ill­ness such as a cold, flu or in­fec­tion can raise your blood glu­cose level.

Stress

Emo­tional stress caused by ex­cite­ment, anger, worry and fear can cause an in­crease in blood glu­cose.

Not enough med­i­ca­tion

When you have less med­i­ca­tion than nor­mal (a missed dose for ex­am­ple) or the med­i­ca­tion you are tak­ing is not ef­fec­tive enough, blood glu­cose lev­els will rise.

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