ON PLAS­TIC SURGERY

Elle (Canada) - - Celebrity -

“I think, in 2016, peo­ple should be more ac­cept­ing of the fact that both fa­mous and non-fa­mous women are hav­ing cos­metic pro­ce­dures. That’s just the re­al­ity. And I think more peo­ple need to ad­mit that shit so it doesn’t have to be so taboo—be­cause we’re all do­ing it any­way.

“I wanted to change my nose be­cause I didn’t grow up with a bump on it—that hap­pened when I got smashed in the face with a soc­cer ball when I was 16. Now I feel like my nose looks the way it’s sup­posed to look. But for how long do we have to ac­knowl­edge that I got a nose job? For the rest of my life? Am I go­ing to be 45 and peo­ple are still say­ing ‘Nice nose job’?

“Ev­ery­one tells you that you should love your body the way it is, but then it is bad to say that you want to change some­thing about your­self not be­cause you want to look like some­one else, just be­cause you want to? What’s wrong with that?

“There’s noth­ing black and white about beauty or plas­tic surgery. There are no guar­an­tees that it will fix how you feel about your­self. All of those women [who crit­i­cize some­one for hav­ing surgery]—if they had $10 mil­lion in their ac­count to­mor­row, I’d dare them not to change one thing about them­selves or at least think about it. Yes, there are some women who wouldn’t change a thing, but, for the ma­jor­ity of us, we’d be think­ing about that one thing. And there’s noth­ing wrong with that. I just hope that in 25 years the con­ver­sa­tion will shift to where if a woman wants to change her body, all we say is ‘Good for her!’ in­stead of sham­ing her for mak­ing de­ci­sions about her own body.”

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