ROSE CER­E­MONY

Jan­uary Jones is just as ob­sessed with re­al­ity TV as you are.

Elle (Canada) - - Radar - BY VIC­TO­RIA DIPLACIDO

sit­ting in the type of Parisian apart­ment you’d file un­der “house goals”—sprawl­ing, stark white, fresh flow­ers ev­ery­where—in the ritzy Place Vendôme neigh­bour­hood, Jan­uary Jones is work­ing through her feel­ings about The Bach­e­lor.

“I’m ob­sessed with it,” says the ac­tress, who is in Paris to an­nounce her new role as the face of Kéras­tase Paris Nu­tri­tive. “I even thought about putting on a pros­thetic nose or some­thing and au­di­tion­ing. But the ques­tion is ‘Do I want to be a con­tes­tant on The Bach­e­lor or be the bach­e­lor­ette?’” It’s an idea, says Jones, laugh­ing, that her pub­li­cist would be less than thrilled with. While it would make for riv­et­ing TV, Jones, who is in­stantly rec­og­niz­able as Betty Draper, the “deeply real” char­ac­ter she played for eight years on Mad Men, would need a more dra­matic over­haul of her ap­pear­ance to get on the show un­de­tected.

It has been al­most a year since the fi­nal sea­son aired, but Jones ad­mits that she is feel­ing nos­tal­gic about the se­ries. “It wasn’t un­til the SAG Awards [in Jan­uary] that the fi­nal­ity of it hit,” she says. “I re­al­ized that that was the last award show we were go­ing to go to to­gether. It’s such a long time to have spent to­gether and then...not. Act­ing in gen­eral is weird like that—it’s very tran­sient.”

Cur­rently, Jones stars in The Last Man on Earth, a com­edy that fol­lows sur­vivors of a virus that wiped out most of the world’s pop­u­la­tion. (Think The Walk­ing Dead with­out the zom­bies and a much bet­ter sense of hu­mour.) It af­fords her the chance to give her hair a break be­cause, as Jones points out, in the post-apoc­a­lyp­tic world, “there are no colourists.”

“We just fin­ished the se­cond sea­son two weeks ago,” she says. “I think we’ll be do­ing an­other one, but I don’t know for sure yet. So right now I’m off.” Jones is keep­ing busy as a mom to her four-year-old son, and she’s toy­ing with the idea of do­ing a movie—if the right role comes along. “I like some­one who is com­pli­cated and flawed. I mean, it’s bor­ing oth­er­wise. I have to re­ally like it, or love it, to want to go and jump into some­thing right away. I just want to chill and do nor­mal stuff.” n

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